B3D Book Club

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by London-boy, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. Laa-Yosh

    Laa-Yosh I can has custom title?
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    So I've gotten into this, partially because of the series and yeah it's good. Basically space opera in a realistic SF setting with some politics thrown in. Works pretty well and the novels are real page turners :)
     
  2. AlBran

    AlBran Ferro-Fibrous
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    I was supposed to be reading Rendezvous with Rama, but then I got sidetracked by the Kushiel trilogy. >_>

    And then I picked up Halo New Blood for cheap, and then some black jewels trilogy. Then I decided to get Legacy of Heorot & Beowulf's Children, and a few more ebooks.

    Lots to read. :rolleyes:
     
  3. Mariner

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    I first read Legacy of Heorot over 20 years ago and have always intended to read Beowulf's children since then. I'll get there some day, no doubt...

    I've just started on Peter Hamilton's latest. The first weighty tome in another series set in the 'Void', which is a little odd as I seem to recall that the Void was ended/solved in the last series of books! Yep, we're in prequel mode so he can play around with a different planet/storyline. 150 or so pages in, it seems OK, but I'm only reading it because I found a copy very cheap. I'm generally losing interest in his books, which is a pity, as his earlier works were very good.

    Other books I recently read are the latest in the 'Ancillary' series from Anne Leckie. Not bad, but the second and third books weren't nearly as interesting as the first. Dark Intelligence by Neal Asher was another entertaining Polity book following his rubbish "Owner" trilogy, The Long Mars by Baxter/Pratchett was as curiously unexciting as the previous couple of books in the series. Very much a Baxter book with pretty much nothing of Pratchett in there, I suppose. I'll probably read the next one, "The Long Utopia" just to finish all things Pratchett off, though we lost him some years ago if you consider the quality of his most recent books.

    Not sure if I've recommended them before, but the Peter Grant series of books from Ben Aaronovich are very entertaining. The first is entitled Rivers of London. Police procedural (with plenty of wry wit), mixed with magic and Gods/Goddesses/Magicians etc. Very entertaining.
     
  4. AlBran

    AlBran Ferro-Fibrous
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    :D

    I had actually read Destiny's Road first a few years back, and... for some reason I just never got around to the original books in that universe (Destiny's Road is a spin-off IIRC).
     
  5. Mariner

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    Don't forget your speckles!
     
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  6. London-boy

    London-boy Shifty's daddy
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    Pssst! The guy just released a new trilogy as a sequel to the original trilogy. I just got the first book. Yay!
     
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  7. tabs

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    :) Yeah I saw the first book was out. I'm trying to hold off until the other two are out so I can binge on them over a week or two.

    Currently listening to Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut. It's my first Vonnegut book and his style is pretty different to what I'm used to. Very conversational and philosophical; it reminds me a bit of Catch 22. I was inspired to try one of his books after finishing Ready Player One, where he was honoured with having the protagonists starship named after him.

    Ready Player One was such a colourful experience. I can't imagine how they'll translate it to screen, but then I can't with most books. Also in this case it must be a licensing nightmare with all the references to various IPs. In fact in the early part of the book it was almost too reference heavy for me, but thankfully the story picked up pace before it got too bogged down in pure nostalgia.
     
    #67 tabs, Apr 13, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2016
  8. Rys

    Rys AMD RTG
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    Oh go on then, I'll start the original trilogy and see how I get on. I'm currently trying to make my way through the Becoming Steve Jobs book, but there's something about the way it's written that makes me put it down after just a few pages each time. Slow going. Then in the backlog I've got The Science of Interstellar (Kip Thorne!), Consider Phlebas (I've never read a Culture novel, erk), and Mohamedou Ould Slahi's Guantanamo Diary, from his time spent there.

    Really should pay attention to this thread more often and write some mini reviews. Forgot all about it. Bad Rys.
     
  9. tabs

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  10. Scott_Arm

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    I just finished reading Ready Player One. I didn't really like it at all. I thought the general idea of the story was good, and there a few interesting bits, notably the beginning and one other section of the story that takes place outside the OASIS later on. Overall, I thought it was poorly written with a sympathetic but unlikable protagonist. I'm not much for nostalgia trips, so the constant referencing to pop culture didn't do anything for me. I felt like I was reading a tween adventure novel for men between the age of 35-45.
     
  11. Scott_Arm

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    Read them all. His novels are all really quick and easy to read, but they are also fairly heavy in terms of content. I'd also read them instead of doing audio books, because in some of them there are drawings. If I remember correctly Slaughterhouse Five is one of the books that has drawings in it.
     
  12. London-boy

    London-boy Shifty's daddy
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    Slaughterhouse Five and the ice one were both a very bad (good) trip.
     
  13. upnorthsox

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    Cat's Cradle
     
  14. Davros

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    Ive only played the game
     
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  15. eastmen

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    I just finished listening to this.

    I have to agree on most of it . I think it peaked at the first gate for me.

    Also considering I'm about to be 35 I have to say its more for men in their 40s to 50s. Most of the games refrenced were after my time.
     
  16. Scott_Arm

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    Yah. I thought it was weird. It's basically name-dropping nerd-culture from the 70s and 80s, but the way that it's written seems like it would be intended for someone in the age range of 12-14.
     
  17. vjPiedPiper

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    I've just started the Bowl of heaven series by Larry Niven + Gregory benford.

    actually wanted to read ringworld by Niven, but ended up getting this series instead.
    So far so good, it introduces an interesting concept for space travel with the bowl thingy.
    I
     
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  18. Scott_Arm

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    Just finished reading Armada, by the same guy that wrote Ready Player One. In a way I liked it better, but it still felt like a teen adventure novel for people aged 35-45.

    I think the writing is better, and it's less heavy on just name-dropping pop culture, but still has its fair share. Definitely written to be turned into a movie, or tv show. Obviously written to be the beginning of a series. Some of it is just too cheesy for me, and it doesn't make a lot of sense on its own. If you just want something mindless and entertaining, it's ok, but nothing remarkable.

    I read it because I happened to pick up both Ready Player One and Armada at the same time. Not sure I'll bother with any of the guy's future novels.
     
  19. Scott_Arm

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    I also re-read Raymond Chandler's, "Farewell my Lovely." It is way more racist than I remember, to the point where it's uncomfortable to read. Definitely has it's moments, and I love that genre, but it is pervasively racist. Very disappointing to go back to it. The Big Sleep is one of my favourite books ever.
     
  20. Rodéric

    Rodéric a.k.a. Ingenu
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    Read the Gunslinger, first book of the dark tower by Stephen King.
    Interesting, reminded me of Deadlands at first.
     
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