transparency

Discussion in 'Tools and Software' started by zed, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. zed

    zed
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    In GFX programs (photoshop/gimp etc) I've never understood why transparency is not handled with a separate channel eg like the alpha channel, why is baked into the actual RGB (yes you have pre multiple alpha etc) but its always a royal PITA to work with eg a PNG with transparency.
    If transparency is low ~10% you cant actually see what the color is, having a separate greyscale image just makes working with them easier
    so WTF did they make it the way they did?
     
  2. milk

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    You can apply a bitmap mask to a layer in photoshop, which is basicically the separate grayscale layer you wished for.
    Now if you inport a transparent png, there is no way to transfer its transparency into that mask unfortunatelly.
    Well not an easy one, at least. What I've done, sometimes is create hundreds of copies of the same png in place and merge them all, effectivelly making opaque everything that is not 100% trasnparent. After that I recreate the mask by getting one last coppy of the png over a solid black layer, and I make the color of the png completely white (by creating a solid white layer on top of it and alt+clicking the space between both layers) and merging everything. Presto. You've got your opaque png, and separate mask.
     
  3. zed

    zed
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    OK thanks mate, yeah I've done that before, copied and pasted the same transparent PNG over itself a lot of times, to get rid of the transparency, the thing is its not exact some of those pixels may be at ~99% transparency but to your eyes thats looks like 100%.
    Im guessing GFX artists just don't save their graphics in a png format, cause once its baked its not easily changed.
    What are the most common non lossy formats used then?
     
  4. milk

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    Nothing comes to my mind. I save assets I'll reuse often as .psds. But I just work with graphic design and video etc. What do you need that for?
     
  5. zed

    zed
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    yes psd is a good file format, as it saves a files history (though at no doubt a larger file), though windows explorer doesnt show a preview. I usually use .tga.
    Im gonna try the following
    https://www.cherubicsoft.com/en/projects/sagethumbs
    I just find it strange that the most common lossless file is actually not that great for image creation, though perhaps that aids for copyright
     

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