Swap PS5 for a RTX 4070?

Precisely correct.

Edit: for anyone interested, I posted my undervolt findings for my 4090 in the Folding@Home thread here: https://forum.beyond3d.com/threads/...-call-for-nvidia-rtx-users.63341/post-2328504
If I feel I need more performance out of the 4070 I'll definitely try undervolting because my card (Ventus 3x) is hard limited to 200W. But since I have a 1080p 144Hz monitor I can max that out in most games at stock. If I'd known how effective DLSS was I'd have gone with 1440p. I can get great IQ at 1080p as long as the game supports DLAA but for some reason that isn't always the case.
 
Yeah I completely understand your perspective. I run a 3440x1440 100Hz monitor so a little more oomph is welcome, however the full power of a 4090 is still pretty overkill in nearly all of my games. It's awesome to run it at my lowest clocks, to the point where it doesn't even get to 200W, and it's still more than enough.
 
Huh, sorry if it seems scary, it really isn't so bad. Honestly, now that I understand how Linux exposes these settings, undervolting makes a little more sense in that world.

Ignore the undervolting stuff for a second, and go back to your regular understanding of overclocking a card. When you use the little "clock slider" to overclock your card today, let's say you set it at +105MHz, what you've done is moved the entire voltage curve up by that clock amount -- just like when my instruction above grabbed the one little dot and moved it up. Now all you need to do is limit the upper clock speed of the GPU so it stays parked at the lower voltages. In MSI Afterburner, you cap the GPU clock speed by changing the voltage curve into a perfectly flat horizontal line, like I showed above with the CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER key combo.

In Linux, we actually use the overclock slider just as I described above, then we use a command to cap the maximum speed of the card (nvidia-smi -i 0 -lgc 210,1905 would cap the maximum speed to 1905MHz but would also allow to fluctuate all the way down to 210MHz when its not under load.) In my mind, it's easier to undervolt in Linux versus Windows, with the notable mention of NVIDIA driver installation and configuration on Linux can be a huge pain in the ass, even moreso for cards which do not have a display directly plugged into them!!

Anyway, I hope you consider trying it some time. There's nothing scary or hard about it, the card will reset if you get a little to aggressive with undervolting. The great news is, you're under-volting the card, so there's nothing damaging about it.
 
Along the lines of what Davros is suggesting, isn't there some kind of voltage offset setting that makes it so you don't have to mess with a whole curve? On my 6700XT I can just run an auto thing in the Radeon software and it will automatically undervolt the card a little bit. Is there such a thing for NVIDIA cards?

Also I'm a little disappointed with how my 4070 is capped by it's power limit. It always sits at 200W under load. The card was $600 and I feel 200W is kind of silly at that price. I think it could perform significantly better if it'd let me increase the power limit by like 20%. That would be a bit overspec on the single 8pin connector but I don't think it'd be a problem. The PSU cable can clearly handle 300W since it has two 8pin connectors on it.
 
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The GPU Tweak 3 utility from Asus kinda sorta seemed to expose something like what you're asking for, however it wasn't a slider you could simply apply. Rather, you selected a "percentage of voltage" target and then ran the OC Scanner function to build a new curve. The challenge is, there's no indiciation of what that percentage value in the voltage slider really means. I set it to 100% and it just seemed to overclock like normal. I set it to 50% and it, well, just seemed to overclock less. I set it to 5% and it underclocked the whole card but not really undervolted. Zero percent just seemed to do the same thing as 100%. Again, I'm completely unsure of what the voltage "percentage" is actually referencing, because it doesn't really look like anything to do with voltage.

What I had hoped would happen is the voltage curve would shift left, instead of shifting up or down. I couldn't make it do what I wanted, even when trying to force it in the same way as the MSI Afterburner curve editor allows.
 
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Along the lines of what Davros is suggesting, isn't there some kind of voltage offset setting that makes it so you don't have to mess with a whole curve? On my 6700XT I can just run an auto thing in the Radeon software and it will automatically undervolt the card a little bit. Is there such a thing for NVIDIA cards?

Also I'm a little disappointed with how my 4070 is capped by it's power limit. It always sits at 200W under load. The card was $600 and I feel 200W is kind of silly at that price. I think it could perform significantly better if it'd let me increase the power limit by like 20%. That would be a bit overspec on the single 8pin connector but I don't think it'd be a problem. The PSU cable can clearly handle 300W since it has two 8pin connectors on it.

What clocks is it maxing out at?
 
@ homer my card comes with an app that let's you do that (only to 105% I think) check your cards website
I also has an "OC Scanner" which I guess tries to figure out the max overclock
 
The power limit slider is what you're probably thinking of; different cards come with different firmwares which set the hardware limit on how far the slider is permitted to go. There are multiple manufacturers who simply do not permit raising the power limit on certain cards / SKUs.

Again, this is exactly the situation where undervolting shines. The factory firmware on my 3080Ti decided it needed 1050mv to run at 1860MHz, which was more than enough to push it past 400W. After a few hours of testing (by playing video games) I determined 850mV was sufficient for running at 1845MHz, which dropped the power requirement by more than 100W for a 15MHz (less than 1%) drop in GPU clock. Undervolting my new 4090 is more of the same; dropping 130W for functionally the same clock speeds is pure insanity, and only took a few hours of Cyberpunk gaming to test and verify.

Trade that power savings for even more clock speed, or for a lot less fan noise, or find a good middle ground.
 
@ homer my card comes with an app that let's you do that (only to 105% I think) check your cards website
I also has an "OC Scanner" which I guess tries to figure out the max overclock
It stays at the 200W cap so overclocking won't do any good unless I lower the voltage which I don't think the auto overclocking apps do.

The official Radeon software could automatically undervolt my 6700XT and it actually worked at least to some extent. Is there any NVIDIA software that can do that automatically?
 
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