SSD Buying Advice

I really think you guys are focused on the wrong issues here.

A spinning drive that isn't being actively used makes essentially no noise. At most, if you hold your entire head near the case, you might hear the very slight whirring of the motor keeping the drive running; modern drives use far better bearings and reduced air pressure (or even helium) within the platter chamber to reduce drag, which also reduces noise and further reduces power consumption. Trying to force a power-down of the drive isn't likely to save you more than a watt or two of total power draw after it's spun down, only to then spend double-digit watts of power just to get it spun back up again. Modern spinning drives are REALLY power efficient when they're only spinning.

If your interest is reducing noise, most modern spinners provide a SMART setting to reduce access noise. This is done by slowing the magnetic actuators which move the heads of the drive. The slower speeds create less clattering noise during seeks, and as a byproduct, also consume less power.

CN: Your GPU consumes more power in 100msec of gaming than your spinning drive does in ten seconds. Don't sweat the small stuff.

EDIT: if you find yourself in the market for a high capacity, performance-oriented spinner, I strongly recommend the Seagate EXOS line above all others. They're a full quality enterprise drive which can be found at nearly commodity prices.
 
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I really think you guys are focused on the wrong issues here.

A spinning drive that isn't being actively used makes essentially no noise. At most, if you hold your entire head near the case, you might hear the very slight whirring of the motor keeping the drive running; modern drives use far better bearings and reduced air pressure (or even helium) within the platter chamber to reduce drag, which also reduces noise and further reduces power consumption. Trying to force a power-down of the drive isn't likely to save you more than a watt or two of total power draw after it's spun down, only to then spend double-digit watts of power just to get it spun back up again. Modern spinning drives are REALLY power efficient when they're only spinning.

If your interest is reducing noise, most modern spinners provide a SMART setting to reduce access noise. This is done by slowing the magnetic actuators which move the heads of the drive. The slower speeds create less clattering noise during seeks, and as a byproduct, also consume less power.

CN: Your GPU consumes more power in 100msec of gaming than your spinning drive does in ten seconds. Don't sweat the small stuff.

EDIT: if you find yourself in the market for a high capacity, performance-oriented spinner, I strongly recommend the Seagate EXOS line above all others. They're a full quality enterprise drive which can be found at nearly commodity prices.

Power draw wasn't a concern for me, only noise. My 4TB HDD wasn't anything special but it was only about 3 years old and I could certainly hear it clearly when just spinning at idle. If there was any background noise then I agree it's a non-concern but I often use my PC in a fairly silent room and in those instances the whirring was clearly audible - very quiet, but audible. I want to not be able to tell if my PC is powered on or not when it's idle - with the same noise levels for no-gaming and light gaming scenario's.
 
I really think you guys are focused on the wrong issues here.

A spinning drive that isn't being actively used makes essentially no noise. At most, if you hold your entire head near the case, you might hear the very slight whirring of the motor keeping the drive running; modern drives use far better bearings and reduced air pressure (or even helium) within the platter chamber to reduce drag, which also reduces noise and further reduces power consumption. Trying to force a power-down of the drive isn't likely to save you more than a watt or two of total power draw after it's spun down, only to then spend double-digit watts of power just to get it spun back up again. Modern spinning drives are REALLY power efficient when they're only spinning.

If your interest is reducing noise, most modern spinners provide a SMART setting to reduce access noise. This is done by slowing the magnetic actuators which move the heads of the drive. The slower speeds create less clattering noise during seeks, and as a byproduct, also consume less power.

CN: Your GPU consumes more power in 100msec of gaming than your spinning drive does in ten seconds. Don't sweat the small stuff.

EDIT: if you find yourself in the market for a high capacity, performance-oriented spinner, I strongly recommend the Seagate EXOS line above all others. They're a full quality enterprise drive which can be found at nearly commodity prices.

Yeah, in my Fractal Design case, I can't hear any of my HDDs (8x mix of Hitachi and WD drives, I guess they are all WD now though ... :p) unless they are spinning up after being idle for an extended time. Once they've spun up they are again inaudible except for extremely muted seeks (almost inaudible) when accessing files. By far the loudest noise in my case that is audible is the GPU fans followed by my noctua CPU fan, followed by the Seasonic PSU fan which are only audible at night when there's almost no ambient noise outside.

Regards,
SB
 
Yeah, in my Fractal Design case, I can't hear any of my HDDs (8x mix of Hitachi and WD drives, I guess they are all WD now though ... :p) unless they are spinning up after being idle for an extended time. Once they've spun up they are again inaudible except for extremely muted seeks (almost inaudible) when accessing files. By far the loudest noise in my case that is audible is the GPU fans followed by my noctua CPU fan, followed by the Seasonic PSU fan which are only audible at night when there's almost no ambient noise outside.

Regards,
SB

They're probably not audible because they're being drowned out by those other fans you mention but 8x spinning HDD's would certainly be audible in isolation.

Both my GPU and PSU fans turn off under low load while my CPU and case fans (all big, high quality ones) are being run at around 25% until temps hit about 70 so as long as it stays below that, it is literally silent, as in you would have to have your ear pressed against the side in a silent room and strain to hear anything. Under those circumstances even one spinning HDD is obvious.
 
They're probably not audible because they're being drowned out by those other fans you mention but 8x spinning HDD's would certainly be audible in isolation.

Both my GPU and PSU fans turn off under low load while my CPU and case fans (all big, high quality ones) are being run at around 25% until temps hit about 70 so as long as it stays below that, it is literally silent, as in you would have to have your ear pressed against the side in a silent room and strain to hear anything. Under those circumstances even one spinning HDD is obvious.

I have Noctua fans spinning at the lowest RPM possible. Honestly it's only really the GPU fan that I hear and only at night when not gaming. SPL here at night is under 10 db when the PC isn't on. You can hear someone breathing from across the room. :p

Regards,
SB
 
I have Noctua fans spinning at the lowest RPM possible. Honestly it's only really the GPU fan that I hear and only at night when not gaming. SPL here at night is under 10 db when the PC isn't on. You can hear someone breathing from across the room. :p

Regards,
SB

Aren't you using a GTX 1070? I can absolutely understand that GPU (which I had previously) drowning out any HDD noise. Personally I didn't realise my HDD was audible until I had both a PSU and GPU that turn the fans off under low usage and then manually stopping every other fan in my system - what was left was the HDD. Since then I got better fans which as noted above I'm also running at effectively the lowest possible RPM (about 25%) until load ramps up. I'm using a Thermalright Peerless Assassin 120 SE on the CPU side which is about as good as it gets on air.
 
Aren't you using a GTX 1070? I can absolutely understand that GPU (which I had previously) drowning out any HDD noise. Personally I didn't realise my HDD was audible until I had both a PSU and GPU that turn the fans off under low usage and then manually stopping every other fan in my system - what was left was the HDD. Since then I got better fans which as noted above I'm also running at effectively the lowest possible RPM (about 25%) until load ramps up. I'm using a Thermalright Peerless Assassin 120 SE on the CPU side which is about as good as it gets on air.

I was, I'm now using a Gigabyte RX 6800.

For noise, it's more about the case you use. It's one reason I went with the Fractal Design case without a side window (windows will let more noise escape vs a side panel with sound mitigating panels) or top vents (horrible for noise control).

Regards,
SB
 
So the plan originally was to buy a large HDD for my games (because size was more important than speed)
But recently games have been released that require a SSD and I can see this trend continuing.
So I'm thinking about this :
1699232299263.png
I started this thread in November 2023 asking if I should buy this (I did)
just looked at it now and
1717984639890.png
So it's gone up £440 in 6 months
 
That was a sale price.

Also SSD prices in general I think have gone up roughly 50% since bottoming back then.

The NAND manufacturers heavily cut capex expansion and even started to run at lower capacity to reduce supply. We're on the upward price trajectory of the current semi-cycle for NAND and DRAM, so we won't see a new bottom for some time barring another major shock.
 
Scan can be very odd with their pricing. I buy a fair bit of enterprise-grade stuff from them including SSDs, but their prices seem more stochastic compared to other suppliers.

Overall though what I've seen matches what arandomguy said, prices are going up and availability is way, way down.
 
I do remember back in November that drive even when not on sale was a lot cheaper at Scan than it was at Overclockers
The 4tb version today (overclockers dont have the 8tb version)
scan
1718048226689.png

overclockers
1718048303008.png
not sure if the today only deal is just the free delivery
 
What is the current best value 2TB PCIe4x4 SSD with DRAM that supports hardware encryption? There are so many models I don't know what I'm looking at. It does seem like the price has gone up since I bought my 2TB MSI Spatium 480 Pro a few months ago.
 
Your insistence on a dram cache, suggests you aren't only concerned with value, but also performance.
Is there also a pci-e version you require as well ?
 
Your insistence on a dram cache, suggests you aren't only concerned with value, but also performance.
Is there also a pci-e version you require as well ?
Yea a good value mid-high performance drive that I can use Bitlocker on if I have to for work. PCIe4 with 4 lanes is fine; I think PCIe 5 drives are still a lot more expensive and run hot.

For reference the 2TB Spatium M480 Pro that I bought was $120-$130 and it fits the bill. Right now it's backordered on Newegg and the price is creeping up. I don't know what is comparable in that price range. There's the Spatium M482 but it doesn't seem to support hardware encryption.
 
I had a look but the website I go to has a specifications section for each drive but so far the only drives that have a dram cache category and a hardware encryption category seem to be the Spatium drives all the other drives have no mention of cache or encryption so do they have them or is it just not listed in the specs for example my drive has a dram cache but it's not listed in the specs on the website?
ps: if pci-e 5 (maybe other types) throttle you can lose 50% of your performance.
 
I had a look but the website I go to has a specifications section for each drive but so far the only drives that have a dram cache category and a hardware encryption category seem to be the Spatium drives all the other drives have no mention of cache or encryption so do they have them or is it just not listed in the specs for example my drive has a dram cache but it's not listed in the specs on the website?
ps: if pci-e 5 (maybe other types) throttle you can lose 50% of your performance.
Yea these things aren't always listed, even on the manufacturer's product page.

The Spatium M482 mentions encryption on it's product page but it is Pyrite which I think is not really encryption.
 
Kinda depends on what you want from "hardware encryption." Windows Bitlocker works on any fixed disk, to include a 40-pin IDE spinner retrieved from a 1990's era 386, or even one of those double-height slow/narrow SCSI 5.25" spinners from the 80's that weigh 10lbs. The same applies to Windows Encrypting File System. As such, are you intending to enable additional encryption mechanisms? And if so, do you have a specific hardware encryption standard you wish to see (FIPS-compliant is the typical ask.)

Pretty sure all of the Samsung Pro and EVO lines come with DRAM cache and support hardware encryption. I would also venture to guess DRAM-less drives will have lower warranties, as DRAM cache is there to manage wear leveling via write aggregation. As such, a good rule of thumb is probably to buy drives with a 5yr warranty, although I suppose this can't be guaranteed to give you a DRAM cache-enabled device.
 
Yessir it was, six 240GB OCZ Vertex drives, I think they were the 2E versions. All strapped to a Highpoint 2720SGL SAS card (using SATA breakout cables.) It's been quite a while since I ran that rig; all the drives survived without issue and basically all of them were given away to better (individual) homes.
 
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