Why English often change the spelling of Alphabeth inside words?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by orangpelupa, Oct 29, 2015.

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  1. homerdog

    homerdog donator of the year
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    Alexko, if you disagree with PC feminist crowd you are automatically an egotistical bigot. Just look how quickly Grall jumped on you. That's why I keep my fucking mouth shut on issues like this :yep2:
     
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  2. milk

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    I was talking specifically about spelling reforms and nothing else. They should be made to reduce inconsistencies, and past Portuguese reforms did for the most part, but there were sertain changes in some that instead of solving inconsistencies they added new ones. That, I disagree with.
     
  3. Davros

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    How about
    "I" before "E" except after "C"
    whats special about C
     
  4. homerdog

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    I think you mean "I before E except after C except when it's not". :runaway:
     
  5. Silent_Buddha

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    Might not be. But there was a big movement starting in the 60's and 70's in education to use "she" instead of "he" for gender neutrality. It at least was a heavy focus of more "PC" writers and teachers, especially in the 80's and 90's when there was heavy backlash in the US towards anything that was male-centric. It's nice that there's been quite a softening of that attitude with "maleness" no longer being something that should be derided in many facets of American society.

    Funnily enough, in the US the word "nigger" is moving back into common parlance in many parts of the country. It's been used that way by African-Americans for quite a few years now, but they are starting to accept non-African-Americans using it as well. As well, it isn't only used to refer to a person with black or dark skin anymore. It's becoming a more generic term, similar in many ways to "Dude" or "Bro." Pronunciation is apparently important as well. Pronounced as "nigga" or "niggah" is acceptable while "nigger" or "niggar" will meet with derision and/or hostility. It's fascinating to see the use of the word evolve, although I still wince whenever I hear it. And it's still not a word I'd ever use, just like I rarely if ever use any form of expletive (fuck, shit, etc.).

    Regards,
    SB
     
  6. BRiT

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    Don't feel bad, Einstein fucked it up twice!
     
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