Unreal Engine 5 Tech Demo, General Availability 2022 Q1

Discussion in 'Console Technology' started by mpg1, May 13, 2020.

  1. Dictator

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    CET!
    All frostbite games do this, I swear - it is frustrating that they essentially do in-engine renders for their cinematics and "gameplay" reveals.
     
  2. Andrew Lauritzen

    Andrew Lauritzen Moderator
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    Do you happen to have a link? I'd be curious to see.
     
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  3. Remij

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    You mean almost as if it's shuffling back and forth between two states unable to properly settle as the camera starts to rest?
     
  4. Frenetic Pony

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    Volume encoded UV maps are already a thing though, don't take up a ton of ram, and use standard texturing! Why bother with 3d texturing when you can use the same art pipeline everyone already has: Link: http://vcg.isti.cnr.it/volume-encoded-uv-maps/


    You'd have to ask Sebbi how he did his SDF physics engine for SDF to SDF collision, but Claybook runs at 60fps on last gen consoles, so it's doable, and efficiently. Others have done everything and anything colliding with SDFs: https://spite.github.io/sdf-physics/

    Just like with any SDF spatial querying you can space skip a lot and the results are just fast. The above demo is running RT shadows and complex particle collisions smooth as anything on my quite old laptop.

    As for other things, I've been going through those, and I suspect a lot of it can be collapsed. Specular and diffuse for example, this was separated to begin with out of sheer performance and data representation. However, as area lights and brdfs and etc. advance the argument for calculating the two separately seems to be vanishing. After all you're just integrating a single signal, the same signal ultimately with energy preservation.


    The same might be doable with a lot of things. Normal maps mipmap directly into roughness, increasingly with svbrdfs, they're describing the same thing. And what they're describing is also the coefficient of friction, you should be able to just get that from the former. Deformability could help drive sound properties, and signed distance fields are practically built to be deformed, you can just update the texture, easy! Speaking of, that's how you do in editor... editing too, spline meshes and the like. There's even papers on how to animate SDFs: https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/3355089.3356502

    Thus I'm not sure complexity need explode unnecessarily, not if its taken into account as a problem to be worked.

    I started thinking of how to do infinitely thin surfaces just yesterday, it is the big let down of them right now. But I'm not convinced it can't be overcome.

    To me, doing a lot of work deciding what it is you're doing, and how you're even going to do it, first and foremost can offer a lot of timesaving later on. The appropriate example is of course UE5 itself. It has multiple texturing approximations, with cards and virtual texturing. It has multiple mesh approximations with nanite and standard geo and distance fields and RT proxies. And multiple people had to take all this into account, had to make tools to make everything work together, have to maintain compatibility all the way through along with having all of that as a dependency for any future changes. That's a lot of work, a lot that might have been largely avoided if they'd communicated, and worked together, and figured out the best course for what everyone needs to do.

    And while artists and tech types are really excited about Nanite, it was Source 2 last year that got game designers far more excited. Look at all the things you can make just in the editor, look how easy it is to make an entire level and change everything around, any shape or even entire buildings with any basic geometry you want can be made in mere minutes and it looks good enough; and with no worries about disc size to boot. Don't get me wrong, it's hard to think of "everything". But to me, SDFs... well they can already do what Nanite does, what Lumen does, and what Source 2 does with its smart geometry tools. Maybe they're not perfect, maybe they can't do thin surfaces, but it seems they can do enough.
     
  5. JoeJ

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    I remember the paper pretty well, although i did not understand it in detail. However, it inherits the typical grid problems: If the model has complex sections (mouth in- and outside, space between fingers, etc.) texture leaks over multiple surfaces. To solve this, you need high volume resolution again. Also it adds a level of indirection: Object space -> UV volume -> 2D texture. Having UVs on triangles avoids this. Finally, it does not really solve any texturing problems. You still need to solve for good UVs and they still have seams across their boundaries.
    The only advantage i see is, if you have multiple discrete LODs, you can share the same UV volume for all of them. Though, the traditional alternative is no real problem either.

    Do you think it's an interesting option for volumetric geometry? Why not using just compressed volumetric textures?

    Can't run on my VirtualBox, but seems about particles colliding against SDF volumes? That's easy because just ray tracing. But to intersect two SDFs, we would need to do something like finding the set where both distances are zero. Maybe a hierarchical top down method would do, but sounds more work than Minkovski sum over convex polyhedras. I'm puzzled how Atomontage or Claybook do this. Recently i did read somewhere SDF is generally faster than polyhedras. But i can't believe it until i know how it works. It's not that rigid body simulators can only do a small number of objects.

    Yeah, but that's not what i meant. It makes sense to use different methods for low frequency lighting (indirect diffuse bounces), and high frequencies (specular / sharp reflections, but also hard shadows). I don't know a method which can do both efficiently.

    Easy? Maybe, but slow. It's a volume, and you need to transform all of it. If you work with surface directly, you transform just that. That's n^3 vs. n^2. And this translates to lighting or rasterization as well. The difference is much too big to 'go all volumetric because it's easy'. Notice i do so actually, but only for the editor, so offline. And i'm not sure if i'm maybe a bit crazy with that.

    There's always something to improve and to criticize. Finding such weaknesses is part of out job.
    But as is, Nanite is a paradigm shift i expected from games industry for decades but never got it. If others follow this example, the innovation lacking dark ages of 'solve everything with GPU brute force' are over, and PS6 might be a tiny PS4 again but with next gen visuals and games. :)
    So, i'm not really an Epic fan, because i dislike and fear the idea of one engine for everything. But actually it's hard to be no fan. Game tech is awesome again. I'm just impressed, and seeing good things happening gives me a lot of optimism for games i had lost.
    From this perspective, even if the shortcomings you mention are true, the actual achievement overcomes it, which is all that matters for now.
    If it would be all perfect already, i could stop working. So even if i sound as the pessimist in our discussion, thinking there is no finally easy best way does not feel that bad! :D

    According to planning ahead to minimize work, i bet a beer you'll realize unexpected issues late nevertheless. No way around the path of failures ;)
     
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  6. Ronaldo8

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    The claim of the Epic China engineer was that the demo runs ''fine'' on a laptop, not that it matched the performance of the PS5. This was in the context that the general thinking at the time was that PCs, irrespective of CPU/GPU grunt, will not be able to run this specific demo at all because of inferior I/O (what with this UE5 demo being supposedly designed around the revolutionary PS5 I/O...lol). Hence the spin from Sweeney that the demo was not actually run on laptop, only a video of it. It was utter BS at the time, but people pointing this out were always rebutted with Sweeney's lies about the absolute need for advanced I/O. A year later, turns out that a more advanced demo of UE5 runs "fine" on a desktop with a freaking HDD and not a crazy amount of RAM in editor mode.
     
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  7. chris1515

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    #2287 chris1515, Jun 10, 2021
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2021
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  8. Andrew Lauritzen

    Andrew Lauritzen Moderator
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    Well I wouldn't personally go *too* far with this narrative. You definitely don't need some crazy-fast SSD and DirectStorage or similar, but regular HDDs (and obviously optical drives) are not able to keep up with the random access latency requirements when you move quickly through a detailed Nanite world. You will see pop-in and low-res geometry in conventional HDDs and for a lot of games that will likely not be shippable.
     
  9. LordVulkan

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    Hi @Andrew Lauritzen

    Could you comment a bit about what a mesh shader pipeline could improve over your SW rasterizer? (or if mesh shaders are useless as they are right now).

    Thanks.
     
  10. DavidGraham

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    Does the console version of the demo use the Epic settings or High settings for Lumen?
     
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  11. chris1515

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    Epic settings at 1080p TSR at 30 fps.
     
  12. Andrew Lauritzen

    Andrew Lauritzen Moderator
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    Lumen twitch stream live:
     
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  13. Ronaldo8

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    True, a SATA SSD should do the trick in terms of cutting down latency. But what about the awesome software rendering that your team has implemented? How does it stack up to mesh/primitive shaders in terms of cache behaviour and minimizing roundtrips to VRAM Do you envision a time in the near future where a software renderer's flexibility will defacto trumps any efficiency gained from the mesh/primitive shader path (like mesh/task shaders beating the input assembler and tessellator) ?
     
  14. chris1515

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    The software rendering part of nanite beat the mesh/primitive shader for less than 4 pixels triangle and by far they said it, this is at least three times faster and it is faster for the tiniest triangles.

    And it goes even faster than the old vertex shader path.
     
  15. PSman1700

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    If the engine is that resource heavy they sure need to optimize the hell out of it.
     
  16. JoeJ

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    Well, after watching Lumen stream, i'm no longer sure we disagree about complexity at all.
    Lumen is 'kitbashing of any method and hacks we could find', even the probe volume i thought isn't used is back. :D
     
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  17. chris1515

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    Lumen is very heavy, a 2070 super nearly reach a real 30 fps locked at 1080p TSR. Same a 3080 and and a 6800 XT aren't able to reach 1080p TSR 60 fps locked. And the demo is more heavy than the first one.
     
    #2297 chris1515, Jun 10, 2021
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2021
  18. snc

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    wonder why its so heavy, ps5 was rock steady 1440p30 in first iteration, now 2070super stuggle with 1080p
     
  19. PSman1700

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    Yet 5700 (XT) is close to PS5, seems AMD has the better optimization going on.
     
  20. trinibwoy

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    The auto generated cluster LOD hierarchy seems to be the secret sauce that nobody else figured out till now. Really impressive how they pulled it all together.
     
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