Global warming

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Frank, Oct 22, 2010.

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  1. MfA

    MfA
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    Nope, you spend the energy increasing the temperature and apart from leakage that energy remains useful.
    This is waste, but as I said ... have you done the numbers?
    Citation needed.
     
  2. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
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    I agree.

    The two main problems with Lithium batteries are grid dispersion/discharge speed and controllability.

    The first one is much improved by Lithium Polymer batteries: because the grid is more scattered, the surface area and thus the reaction speed increase. Which allows more of the potential (chemical) energy to be released before the total wattage the cell can deliver drops below the threshold needed.

    The second part is in the monitoring and controlling the storage and release of that energy: if the cell heats up too much, it loses capacity fast. And when it heats up even more, it explodes. To counter that effect and increase the amount of storage available, we need better sensors and smarter charge/discharge strategies.

    This makes a big difference: the perceived capacity of a LiPoly cell is more than twice that of a regular LiIon cell. And the theoretical limit is much higher.
     
  3. hoho

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    How often should I keep reminding you this promise?
     
  4. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
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    Lithium is pretty abundant. It's the 25th most common element in the Earth's crust.

    It's just very reactive, and thus hard to extract. But very easy to recycle. Like aluminium.
     
  5. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
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    Well, we have electronic force microscopes where we can hit a specified atom with the tip of a probe. Mechanical. And targeting and focusing an electron (or ion) beam is simpler, if you know where the target is. Still plenty hard, but very doable, as long as you have enough fidelity on the voltages on the coils.

    The main problem will be in supplying the (electrically neutral) targets at the right location (or pinned down ions behind a screen), not in the hitting that location.
     
    #1525 Frank, Mar 9, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 9, 2012
  6. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
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    Pass.
     
  7. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
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    Ask me a direct question, and I'll answer it.
     
  8. hoho

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    You don't seem to know much (anything?) about quantum and particle physics if you claim it's that easy.
    Questions were asked by Mintmaster when he told why Rutan's "paper" was wrong. As you claimed it to be correct I'd like to know who was actually right. I haven't seen your reply for this post.
     
  9. KimB

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    Well, no, it isn't easy. It's fantastically difficult. But it is possible to direct single atoms. For example:
    http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/vintage/vintage_4506VV1003.html

    Granted, this is absurdly slow and fantastically difficult, and thus not practical for pretty much anything. I'd be rather surprised if we ever got to the point of large-scale production of structures built from the specific positioning of individual atoms.

    But the bigger problem where semiconductor processes is concerned is that once you get to transistors that are on the order of a hundred atoms wide (roughly 10nm), they start to behave in an extremely quantum way, which significantly changes their behavior. We probably can compute with 10nm transistors, but it isn't going to be easy.
     
  10. hoho

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    Slowly moving around single (metal == big!) atoms is a piece of cake compared to the precision you need to smash few proton-neutron nucleus together at extreme speeds. Average nucleus is about 2500x smaller than hydrogen atom, x-ray wavelength is ~500x greater and gamma ~100x.

    Also, this whole moving single particles wasn't about semiconductors but fusion energy :)
     
  11. KimB

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    Oh, yeah, there's basically no way to do the same thing with atomic nuclei.
     
  12. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    I saw a blurb in the tech news stream the other week about a demostration of a single atom transistor. Now, it probably isn't very useful, because it takes lots of transistors to get any decent sort of work done and building chips out of hundreds of millions of these transistors sound like the headache of all times, but it's pretty interesting stuff nevertheless methinks.

    After all the solid-state transistor itself was a bit of a useless curiosity around the time when it was invented, wasn't it? So who knows where some adaptation of this tech might end up in the future...
     
  13. KimB

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    My understanding is that these are single electron transistors, which aren't quite as spectacular. I mean, sure, the single electron does come from a single atom. But the way transistors behave, that one electron tends to wander as many as a hundred atoms away. So I don't think you can realistically build single-electron circuits whose total size is smaller than a hundred or so atoms. You might be able to reduce that by a factor of a few with clever tricks, but I doubt you can do all that much better.

    That said, building a single transistor and fabricating devices with trillions of them are entirely different ballgames.
     
  14. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    Yeah, I'm sure you're right there, it was a pop science article, and those often gloss over the more complex aspects. There was an image, probably made with electron tunneling microscope or such that showed what appeared to be source and drains, with a single blip sitting in the middle of them. Supposedly that one lone blip was the "single atom transistor", but the whole device consists of quite a few more atoms than that.

    But, still, interesting stuff that might have useful potential in the future...
     
  15. pharma

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    Where things stand today ....

    [​IMG]
    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48678196
     
    AlBran and iroboto like this.
  16. iroboto

    iroboto Daft Funk
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    I suspect if North America was getting it as bad as EU and Asia, we'd be singing a different tune here. But we're not. I heard UAE hit 56.C under the shade. Which is mental because the body is dying above 40.C; and my water tank heater is set to heat water to 50.C
     
  17. Bludd

    Bludd Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall
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    Funny, It Worked Last Time...
    Depends on the humidity. If it's very humid and it's over 40 C, it can be intolerable. If it is dry, you can be exposed to much higher temperatures. Just think of a sauna, they can be up to 100 or even 110 C, but very dry. Contrast with a turkish bath which is humid, you would scald and have severe problems at sauna temperatures.
     
  18. Davros

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    Especially considering that in 12.0107 grams of carbon or 28.0855 grams of silicon there are 6,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 atoms (thats 60 with 23 zeros)
     
  19. iroboto

    iroboto Daft Funk
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    As long as your body can find eventual shelter from the heat. Obviously in humidity the chance of death is higher, your sweat can no longer evaporate because the air is already full of moisture - i believe the number is closer to 45. In dry hot air, yes you can sweat off a lot more heat. But if you run out of water you dead ;)

    40C+ is the point in which your body is on the decline to organ failure (if you cannot find a way to cool off, or stave off the heat for a brief moments of time) it will lead to eventual death. Older people or infants will die first before younger 20-30 yea olds etc because their bodies are less equipped to deal with it.

    Core body temperatures above 38 is the real issue. People will starts to have seizures when they have fevers pushing their temperatures greater than 40C
     
  20. Bludd

    Bludd Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall
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    Funny, It Worked Last Time...
    Yes, but you can sweat in Abu Dhabi even if it is a scorcher.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_European_heat_wave

    This was basically a natural disaster where thousands upon thousands died.
     
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