Apple does a new record(?) in trying to screw a customer

Discussion in 'PC Hardware, Software and Displays' started by Kaotik, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. Mize

    Mize That's my stapler
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    Sure enough to point out that Nvidia was paying to replace bumpgate...Sony paid to replace exploding Dell batteries (that Sony manufactured).

    The point is that, at some point, an integrator of technologies cannot have the expertise to own design and manufacturing responsibility for everything inside it's integrated product.

    The company that sells to the end user bears the responsibility to service the customer, handle the recall, etc., but the component supplier must take responsibility downstream for their products.

    I mean do you really thing that a company that doesn't manufacture GPUs and who buys GPUs from nvidia should be responsible for nvidia quality issues? Certainly they should be the interface for fixing the problems, but nvidia should be on the hook for the costs.
     
  2. Dr Evil

    Dr Evil Anas platyrhynchos
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    Well he did say this already "The part manufacturer certainly could be responsible (I suppose it depends on if the product actually meets specs, or usage is out of scope for the part) but from a consumer perspective that's behind the scenes, the manufacturer has to work that out with them"

    So where is the disagreement?

    The "overclocked" thing was just a higher factory setting (i7 930 vs i7 920 for example). His Macbook was 2.6Ghz all along, but apparently the recall campaign was only issued to slower models, possibly due to them only being available at the time I dunno, but it was just a really sleazy way for Apple trying to get away with it.
     
  3. Silent_Buddha

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    This reminds me of when I was in the support industry over a decade ago.

    Microsoft at the time would fix customer issues even if the issue wasn't caused by anything related to one of the Microsoft products.

    OEMs would often send their customers to MS support rather than paying to support their own products.

    So if a printer wasn't working. Send it to MS. MS support then ended up helping a customer find the appropriate driver for their printer and then attempt to troubleshoot why their printer wasn't working if it still had problems. Even down to trying to troubleshoot hardware issues with the printer.

    Computer bluescreening due to faulty memory from the manufacturer? Again, MS support getting stuck with the bill of troubleshooting the issue and then attempting to advise the customer on how to proceed as their OEM (HP, Dell, Asus, etc.) wouldn't provide provide proper support.

    Funny thing was. MS support also ended up having to troubleshoot and fix Mac OS issues. If a Microsoft product was even remotely on the system (for example, Internet Explorer is installed and Mac OS is booting slowly), Apple support would automatically reroute the support call to Microsoft. WTF? :p 8 times out of 10, it was something going wrong with Mac OS and nothing to do with the MS product.

    So yes, there are times when a component provider (in this case Microsoft) ends up getting stuck with the responsibility of fixing the equipment manufacturer's (in this case Apple, HP, Dell, Asus, etc.) problems.

    Regards,
    SB
     
  4. Pressure

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    Wouldn't surprise me, after all, they had a 5 year agreement with Microsoft during that period. Luckily, that is 9 years ago that Internet Explorer for Mac went defunct and replaced as the default browser by Safari in Mac OS X.
     
  5. Silent_Buddha

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    Good to hear, I absolutely hated supporting the Mac during System 7, then Mac OS 8 and 9. If anything could make WinME seem fantastic it was having to support the Mac OS back in those days. What an utterly horrible OS. By the time OSX was released I was in the process of getting out of the support industry.

    I think my experience supporting Macs back then is one of the primary reasons I won't even consider getting a modern Mac even though Mac OSX is orders of magnitude better than previous operating systems on Mac.

    Regards,
    SB
     
  6. Davros

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    Really ? All you heard from mac users was how wonderful it was
     
  7. Pressure

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    Well, we all make our own experiences, let's just leave it at that.
     
  8. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    I used PPC macs in the early/mid 90s, not sure what version system it was, but it was fucking awful that's for sure. It crashed all the bloody time when you least expected it; essentially for doing NOTHING much of the time. Just using the damn computer like you expect to be able to use a computer and BOOM. Out of a clear sky, crash. And often it'd crash so hard you needed to yank the power cord because nothing else would fix it. (Macs don't have hardware reset buttons, of course.........)

    It was an absolutely insanely bad OS. I think OSX is pretty damn crap really, but it's a miracle in comparison to how it was back then.
     
  9. Mize

    Mize That's my stapler
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    I missed the PPC years - was on NeXTStep/HPUX/Solaris etc. back then, but I do seem to remember something called BSOD on the win3.1 and win95 machines in adjacent offices :)
     
  10. Davros

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    Trust me, BSOD is alive and well ;)
     
  11. Blazkowicz

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    you could recover from BSOD back then :lol:, and on 3.1 it was part of the UI - what you get when pressing ctrl-alt-del.

    Mac OS was that OS I would read about sometimes in magazines, it was called something weird like "System 6.5.1" or "System 7.2" and you had to manually set some memory allocation directive for each program. (the memory managers crap in MS-DOS is something you do once for all, except some old conflicting games)

    you couldn't find the command prompt either.
     
    #51 Blazkowicz, Apr 27, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2012
  12. Mize

    Mize That's my stapler
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    Totally OT other than the earlier chat about laptop quality...but the announced Maingear Pulse 11 looks mighty nice for a gaming traveler. 11" Ivy Bridge i5 with a 650M GPU.
     
  13. Pressure

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    A shame about the 1366 x 768 resolution though.
     
  14. AlphaWolf

    AlphaWolf Specious Misanthrope
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    What were you expecting on 11"?
     
  15. eastmen

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    I dunno

    15inch mac book pro $1,800
    2.2ghz i7
    4GB of ram 1333mhz
    1550x900 inch screen
    500 gig drive
    Radeon 6750m 512m

    HP envy 15 inch $1,099
    i5 2450m 2.5ghz
    1 gig 7690m
    6GB of ram 1333 mhz
    500 gig hardrive

    1366x768 screen


    HP envy at 1,800
    i7 2860qm 2.5ghz
    8gigs of ddr 1600 ddr 3
    15.6inch 1920x1080 screen

    The 7690 is just a 6750m with more ram.
    [​IMG]


    Mac book pros are fine but you get little machine for the cost. I've been very impressed with Hp's build quality over the last few years , it keeps getting better and I'd rather have an hp over an apple at this point .

    I'd remove the disc drive from the envy and load in a ssd however
     
    #55 eastmen, Apr 28, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2012
  16. Mize

    Mize That's my stapler
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    I might consider an HP next round, but that fiasco with HP I mentioned earlier still stings.
    15.6" is too big (IMHO) for economy class gaming. I do it, but 13" would be perfect and 11" a bit small.
    Going 19x10 on a laptop means it'll be too huge, likely too heavy.
     
  17. Arwin

    Arwin Now Officially a Top 10 Poster
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    2048x1536? :p
     
  18. zed

    zed
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    It'll be coming in a couple of months no doubt, which should hopefully raise the bar significantly
     
  19. Mize

    Mize That's my stapler
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    lol, 20x15 on an 11" screen basically in your lap - I'll go blind playing RTS games :)
     
  20. Pressure

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    Windows doesn't support HiDPI?
     

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