Advanced Audio Technologies (HRTF, Dolby Atmos, etc) *echo*

Discussion in 'Console Industry' started by Cyan, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. Entropy

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    Hearing damage is sneaky. Typically it is a progressive change over many years, and you have no point of reference - what you hear is what is there, right? So once you become aware, the damage is often fairly pronounced, and it will only get worse with time.
    It used to be that military and musicians, along with certain heavy industry workers were the worst off, but headphone listening has been a great equaliser in terms of hearing damage. Now everyone can have it. As long as you can hear conversation you are socially OK though, which is what's most important. As Shifty pointed out, nobody out of kindergarten can hear the highest frequencies, but sensitivity can still be really good. Once sensitivity vs. frequency vs. levels is getting really wonky, your brain start having problems correctly interpreting the input.
    Moral - simply avoid too high SPLs, and check your hearing properly if you notice signs that something might be off.

    Oh, and STAX ear speakers. :)
     
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  2. Entropy

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    This is a really important aspect of hearing you are delving into here - that it is a capture and interpretation system. The brain does a lot of work, and your personality such as how easily you drift off in your own thoughts or get distracted by visual or auditory input, or for that matter if you are a trained listener all plays a large role in how much of what your ears pick up that your mind is aware of and can make sense of.

    I think most adults have had the experience of for instance a ventilation system turning off, and you feel how your whole system just relaxes in relief even though you weren't consciously aware of the noise. The brain is a huge part of hearing.
     
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  3. Shifty Geezer

    Shifty Geezer uber-Troll!
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    That's normal and not an issue of damage. It's a cool feature of getting older that allows you to play a high frequency tone on a mobile device and drive children scatty while being perfectly at peace yourself.
     
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  4. BRiT

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    My first thought is always "Save. SAVE. SAVE your work. The power is about to go out." Followed by "Just great, the AC just died." Those are about the only time it's not running, when at work.
     
  5. turkey

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    This is so true and totally misunderstood by many. My "hearing is good for my age" yet in a busy room like a bar or canteen I cannot hear anyone except the person to my side or directly opposite.

    I really suffer in translating the speech sounds I hear into the correct words, or even any words.

    Phone calls can be very difficult as it's usually loud on my side and I cannot see the person, so even the phone at full volume I feel like it's really hard to hear them.

    Sorry not a therapy thread? :runaway:
     
  6. Cyan

    Cyan orange
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    BRiT and ToTTenTranz like this.
  7. ToTTenTranz

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    I can't figure out if the Headphone:X also does downmixing of multichannel audio, like Atmos does.
     
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