Trinity vs Ivy Bridge

Discussion in 'Architecture and Products' started by rpg.314, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. liolio

    liolio Aquoiboniste
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    It is more than that... significantly check newegg... 85$ for an GDDR5 HD6670
    Ok you go there again, you are desperate... I added you to my ignore list to avoid losing more time...
    There is no point discussing with you.
     
  2. jimbo75

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    That comment was a general "you" and wasn't specifically aimed at you personally, but feel free to do whatever you wish with your ignore list.
     
  3. Andrew Lauritzen

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    No doubt it is, but for desktop performance I just don't see even a 130W socket as being too interesting if it's shared between the CPU and GPU. Obviously I'm a "gamer" and buy fairly high-end stuff, but I feel like there's not a huge market for stuff that's "somewhat" higher TDP than a standard laptop, but far below a typical gaming desktop machine.

    We'll see though :)
     
  4. jimbo75

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    Well I'm a gamer who used to buy the latest hardware but stopped a couple of years ago. I recently bought a 2500K but before that I had my Phenom II for almost 3 years. I bought a 6850 at launch and that's almost 2 years old now. This system plays Guild Wars 2 at near maximum settings and I'm struggling to justify upgrading again.

    If AMD had a decent gaming core, eDRAM or something else that got rid of the bandwidth problem, and was spending 75W on their APU graphics then it would probably not be that far away from what I have right now. At a rough guess that should be well over 50% of the current gaming market accounted for.

    I'd guess 4-5 years before all the pieces are in place, at which point the hardware will have advanced so far past the software that it will probably feel like a high end machine. They have to survive the next 4-5 years of course.
     
  5. UniversalTruth

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    But as you probably saw, I wrote "just kidding". It doesn't mean anything to you, and I asked if you wanted something like that as well? :???:

    Ok, time flies so fast that we cannot simply forget so easily X1900 series. These years are nothing, it was so soon.
    I suspect those cards are decent for many good things even today. ;)

    And , this only proves my point that it is exactly AMD (ATi) from historical point of view who are considered as the brand delivering state-of-the-art features first. Just mentioning DX10.1 and DX11 would be enough.
     
    #725 UniversalTruth, Oct 10, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2012
  6. Andrew Lauritzen

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    Here's the thing though... if a "good enough" system like that is fine, then a laptop is going to fine for you too (at most a year later, but you upgrade far less often) and then you can game on the go too. As the market has demonstrated, most people value mobility a lot more than gaming. I just don't see too many people who really fall into your scenario of wanting a desktop (for some reason other than performance), but not bothering with a discrete GPU.

    iGPUs/trinity in laptops are very interesting to me. Desktops, not so much.
     
  7. Alexko

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    Desktops are usually cheaper, have more storage and larger monitors.
     
  8. jimbo75

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    Some people dislike laptops as well. I hate gaming on one, it's awful in comparison to a desktop and as far as work goes, I like at least two large desktop screens.

    Desktop's get bad press I feel but there are still a lot of people who would just rather sit at one instead of having a laptop. I don't believe these people are all running the latest cpu and gpu however, and I'd reckon my setup is still well in the top half even though it's a 2 year old midrange gpu.
     
  9. Blazkowicz

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    They are also tied to speakers and a real keyboard.
    But for many people, sure, a laptop will do, sometimes a 17" or 18" that never leaves the house but can be use anywhere inside it.

    Meanwhile I'm using a friend's linux netbook while comfortably lying. (er, not saying lies)
    It's like an ipad, but with a keyboard and without the library of fart games.
    The desktop is good enough to watch movies at, and better for stupid games. But I'm disliking it as I have to fix it a bit and I'm fed up sitting too much at it.

    I guess people don't want to deal with their desktop either (dealing with the graphics card fan that became unbearable, failing hard drives etc.)
    Buy a laptop and here, it works (for now), and you didn't even crawl under the table to deal with ten cables full of dust.
     
    #729 Blazkowicz, Oct 11, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2012
  10. Andrew Lauritzen

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    Meh, I know a fair number of people who just dock or otherwise connect a laptop to multiple monitors these days, often using the laptop screen just for secondary stuff like e-mail, IM, video streams, etc. I don't think the "sitting at a desk" form factor is really going to ultimately save desktops any more than "sitting on a couch" is going to save proprietary console hardware.
     
  11. DieH@rd

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    Does anyone know what are manufacturing costs of Ivy Bridge desktop line, and how much profit is Intel making with them? Also, similar info for AMD.
     
  12. ERP

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    That's how I work every day.
    I have a work desktop, but it sits under my desk powered off most of the time.
    It's a stupidly expensive laptop, but it is "fast enough" and I have access to all my files when I travel.
     
  13. 3dcgi

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    With SSDs docking a laptop is a better option than it used to be, but I still prefer a desktop that I can remotely log into if necessary. The good thing is both options work so there's no one size fits all.
     
  14. Andrew Lauritzen

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    Don't get me wrong though - I don't think desktops are doing away. I just think gaming and workstation-class machines are going to be the vast majority of the desktop market, with fewer and fewer "casual" users buying them.
     
  15. Malo

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  16. Dave Glue

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    I've heard the theory more than once that it's possible that desktops may make a slight comeback due to tablet sales cannibalizing laptops to some extent.

    With the continual rise of cloud services to sync all our data and user settings, it may make less sense to carry around your world with you with a laptop that can be destroyed by an errant drop or the risk of theft. A tablet may give you 80% of the functionality you need on the road, with a SFF desktop hooked up to a large screen available for you at home/work to seamlessly transfer to when you really need to delve into your work.

    Edit: Yikes, old thread!
     
    #736 Dave Glue, Jan 13, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2013
  17. UniversalTruth

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    Last quarter PC market lost 6-7%. :roll:

    If it had been only this, but they have the evil intentions to force people use only visualising devices like monitors and all processing power to be in the cloud. Which of course sucks and someone if not all of us should stop them... :roll:

    Yeah, because obviously tablets are less exposed to theft risk. :lol:
     
  18. Dave Glue

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    The point it's not your only computing device, if it's lost/damaged/stolen you're not screwed completely when disaster strikes. Same goes for a cheap laptop+desktop combo of course, albeit remote tracking/wipe are more common on tablets atm.

    Use more emoticons.
     
  19. Silent_Buddha

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    I see it more as Tablets enabling a certain segment of the market to ditch both laptops and desktops.

    I'm just waiting for some enterprising company to come up with a tablet dock that functions as a monitor stand complete with tilt, swivel, and pivot. Hence, once docked you basically have all of your desktop functionality including adjustable monitor stand.

    In such a case, the PC hardware install base will decline, but the PC user install base continues to grow. IE - more and more people using PC's but less people with multiple PC's (laptop + desktop).

    There's also a unique situation where "if" (big IF still) Windows based tablets take off, that the PC market will shrink while the non Windows tablet market also shrinks.

    In other words, there's a possibility that instead of a person having a desktop + laptop + tablet as many do currently, they could just end up with only Windows based tablet. Or someone with just a laptop + tablet could end up with just a Windows based tablet. Obviously there will always be people that require more computing power than a mobile device can bring, but I think for a majority of people a single Windows based tablet could replace all of their computing devices quite easily. A mobile slate, laptop w/keyboard dock, and desktop w/monitor docking station all in one device.

    It's also entirely possible that a few years from now, smartphones will be able to run a full blown install of Windows. At which point it could be argued that one device could realistically replace 4 computing devices all in one.

    It's still early days and anything can happen.

    Regards,
    SB
     
  20. imaxx

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    I find it hard to believe. People will still want a large monitor and a keyboard (typing on a tablet or using a 10" monitor is a no-go).
    While I really believe that -with better accumulator- we can have powerful phones/tablets, I hardly find a replacement for a 15-17" readable surface (maybe keyboard can be laid off by voice recognition, but not monitor..).
     
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