Real3d R3D/100, has anyone ever seen it?

Discussion in 'Architecture and Products' started by [EOCF] Tim, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know it's absolutely ages ago (1995/6), but I can remember it not being marketed to consumers, but just to professional workstations.

    You can find a reasonable amount of information on it, but I have never ever seen a picture of a board. It featured an integrated geometry engine, graphics processor and real-time texture processor, and apparently it was screaming fast. It was made by Lockeed Martin, and it came as the R3D/100 and R3D/Pro-1000, both in PCI format.


    I'm not quite sure at what level the Intel i740 is based on this chipset, I've heard that it was a severely cut down version of that original chipset, then again I've read that it was just a joint effort between Real3D and Intel to produce a consumer board, building on the experience Real3D had gathered on the R3D/100.


    This is one of the cards I'm really hoping to add to my collection once, but after looking for one for years everyday on eBay and other sites, I've got the funny feeling I will never see one. Of course, that's what I thought of the Pyramid3D, but I still managed to find a board.

    Anyway, does anyone have a picture of this board, or perhaps even have one?

    - Tim
     
    #1 [EOCF] Tim, Dec 7, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2008
  2. Davros

    Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2004
    Messages:
    15,717
    Likes Received:
    2,856
  3. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Peter? Moi? :lol: :lol: :wink: naaah
     
  4. Rys

    Rys PowerVR
    Moderator Veteran Alpha

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2003
    Messages:
    4,164
    Likes Received:
    1,461
    Location:
    Beyond3D HQ
    I'll have a look later, I've got some Lockheed graphics hardware in my collection but I don't remember them being R3D/100s. I might get lucky though in the box of stuff I've not properly catalogued. Here's hoping :D
     
  5. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Rys, here's hoping as well! :grin:
     
  6. tripleagent

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
  7. Simon F

    Simon F Tea maker
    Moderator Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    4,560
    Likes Received:
    157
    Location:
    In the Island of Sodor, where the steam trains lie
    I remember seeing those boards on a visit to Japan and thinking they were enormous!
     
  8. swaaye

    swaaye Entirely Suboptimal
    Legend

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Messages:
    8,567
    Likes Received:
    652
    Location:
    WI, USA
    Seems kinda funny that they married that GPU hardware to the sad little PowerPC 603. Especially for something released in '96, when 200 MHz PPros and even faster Alphas were around.
     
  9. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    That looks great, I assume the chips were under the memory board?

    http://www.system16.com/boards/model3_cpu1.jpg
    http://www.system16.com/boards/model3_cpu2.jpg

    Looks like they put the Sega logo on the chips.
     
  10. Megadrive1988

    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    4,664
    Likes Received:
    184
    Yup. There was a Next Generation article, press releases, indicating that R3D/100 would be targeted towards the consumer desktop market, for $180 ~ $200, but that turned out not to be the case. It was ultimately the i740 of years later that was targeted at consumers.



    I've never seen a board either.

    R3D/100 was a midrange-to-highend card for PCs and workstations. R3D/Pro-1000 was very highend, and I think for workstations, image generators and was used in parallel in Sega Model 3 arcade boards. Not sure if there was a PCI version of Pro-1000.

    Intel i740 wasn't based on R3D/100, other than it was made by the same company. It was a single chip, no geometry engine. I suppose it was based on what Real3D gained from building R3D/100, but they're not the same architecture. i740 was the chip used in Lockheed Martin's consumer/gamer StarFighter cards.

    I'd be happy just to see some video with the R3D/100 in action.
     
  11. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for that, funny, when I was researching this card, quite a few posts of you came up on google. :)

    ( I was kind of hoping you would reply! )

    Well here's hoping I will ever find a PCI card, /100 or /Pro-1000.
     
  12. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Spending the last hour or so googling makes me detail my initial statement about there being enough information a bit more.

    These are pretty much only announcements, and the specs of the card, no where, literally no where, can you find anything about anyone running the card or working with the card. I found one snippet with a quote from somebody who used to work for Real3D at the time, commenting on the Riva128 and how bad it's texturing was compared to the R3D/100 he used to work with at the time.

    It looks like a very very old website, but the main page is still up and is from a software company, I emailed them, to see if I can get in contact with this person. Any tiny lead should be pursued. :wink:

    That's pretty much it, some txt files of them planning to show it at Comdex, and Wescon and some random news items. An interesting one :

    Wave magazine, issue 614 11/25/96, Comdex report.

    Now that's interesting I thought. Games running on it? Very interesting. Also read apart of the R3D/100 running a demo by the name 'Global' or something, lost the link now.

    Something else, again of the announcement type :

     
  13. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Vendor & Model : Lockheed Martin R3D-PRO-1000

    Performance
    [SIZE=-1](textured polys/sec)[/SIZE] : 750,000

    Price
    [SIZE=-1](Approx) : [/SIZE]$37,500

    Available : 1996

    Phew, expensive it sure was. :)
     
  14. Davros

    Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2004
    Messages:
    15,717
    Likes Received:
    2,856
    Dont let nvidia see that price it'll give them idea's
     
  15. swaaye

    swaaye Entirely Suboptimal
    Legend

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Messages:
    8,567
    Likes Received:
    652
    Location:
    WI, USA
    Although it is a useless benchmark, I believe a Voodoo1 card + Pentium II can push more polys than R3D 1000. No geometry engine though.
    http://www.3dfxzone.it/dir/3dfx/prodotti/voodoo1graphics/ (according to this, it can do more with just a P166)

    I wonder what the fillrate was. That's more useful.

    Model 3 arcade games and Voodoo arcade games weren't that far apart, visually. Sega had more style in some of their games I think, which makes a difference.

    Model 3
    http://www.system16.com/hardware.php?id=717
    http://www.system16.com/hardware.php?id=718
    http://www.system16.com/hardware.php?id=719

    Atari 3Dfx boards
    http://www.system16.com/hardware.php?id=782
    http://www.system16.com/hardware.php?id=781
     
    #15 swaaye, Dec 9, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2008
  16. KyoDash

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Perhaps, though the level of geometry and effects are noticeably higher in Model 3 games. In addition the Model 3 Step 1.5 and higher, were able to draw 1 million pps at 60fps with full visual effects on screen. Also, in an AM2 interview for Sega Saturn Magazine (UK), it was mentioned that Step 1 didn't have enough fill rate or processing power to do this.

    I've never seen a even a dual Voodoo 2 set up achieve anywhere near this in real world situations, certainly it couldn't with similar image quality. Then again nobody pushed 3D hardware for gaming more than Sega back then.
     
  17. Megadrive1988

    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    4,664
    Likes Received:
    184
    Model 3 arcade games looked visually much better than 3Dfx Voodoo/Banshee/Voodoo2/Voodoo3 based arcade games.

    Real3D/Pro-1000 image quality was much superior, as was its real-world polygon counts with textures, lighting, AA and other effects on.

    Model 3 games always ran at 60fps, whereas some 3Dfx-based arcade games ran at ~30fps and some at 60fps, but never with the level of geometry and image quality of Model 3 games.
     
  18. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Man, 1995 onwards were very exciting times I must say, with all the new and exciting hardware released, really the birth of 3D. :)

    I'm collecting all the high end cards from 1994 to 2003, from the birth of 3D to round about the time of Farcry/Doom3, I think that was when the classic/golden age stopped, that's basically my collection, only need about a handful to complete it, but they are very rare. For instance the Creative 3D Blaster VL-Bus (VESA Local bus) CT6200 from 1995, it wasn't good, didn't sell properly, so they are almost completely non existent today.

    I made a detour in 3DFX and Quantum3D, which I almost all own (except vendor specific V1 and V2's), still need some 3dFx prototypes, like the 6000, and one or two Quantum3D cards, but those are mainly due to the lack of funds.

    atm, I'm still looking for the following

    PowerVR Neon 250
    SiS Xabre 600
    XGI Volari V8 Duo Ultra
    Real3D R3D/100

    And one or two other rare cards :

    Quantum3D Obsidian 100SB
    Videologic Apocalypse 5D
    Intel i752 (NFR)
    Intel i754 (NFR)
    Hercules Thriller Conspiracy
    Jazz Multimedia Outlaw
    Hercules 3D Prophet 4800 (NFR)
    Kyro II SE (NFR)

    (NFR, not for resale ie. either prototypes or never made it to retail.)
     
    #18 [EOCF] Tim, Dec 10, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2008
  19. zsouthboy

    Regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2003
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Derry, NH
    Tim, are you going to put up a website somewhere so you can show off your collection? I'm sure we'd love to see it.
     
  20. [EOCF] Tim

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, I am actually in the progress of making one, but sadly my website skills are zero, so I need to find some proper software that doesn't make it look like a 1995 website. :smile:

    I've got high res pictures of all of my cards already tho, and a detailed database with the specs. They are about 125 different cards, and some old school platforms to go a long with it, ranging from 486 to Athlon XP-M.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Beyond3D has been around for over a decade and prides itself on being the best place on the web for in-depth, technically-driven discussion and analysis of 3D graphics hardware. If you love pixels and transistors, you've come to the right place!

    Beyond3D is proudly published by GPU Tools Ltd.
Loading...