Intel Sandy Bridge E (LGA2011) review thread

Discussion in 'PC Industry' started by Bludd, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. Silent_Buddha

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    The only problem with that is the LGA 1155 IVB CPU's should be out within 6 months or so. The LGA 2011 IVB-E CPU's likely won't be out for 1.5-2.0 years from now.

    And just like with SB versus SB-E, there will be little to no benefit in most consumer apps (especially games) unless they are heavily threaded.

    You'll end up waiting for an extra year for a more power hungry chip that does the same thing in most applications as the 4 core LGA 1155 version.

    Regards,
    SB
     
  2. HMBR

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    I think ivy bridge-e is going to be released in q4 2012?
    that's not a huge delay compared to the 1155 ivy...
    but you know, the power consumption is a valid argument, but I don't think the SB-E using only half the cores/l3 is going to use really that much more, and while ivy may improve things even further for the lga 1155, the importance and real difference of this is not that clear...

    in terms of CPU performance the expected improvement for ivy bridge, doesn't seem to be high, so I don't think it will immediately appeal as an upgrade to the sb/sb-e owners, and I think the possible gains with a 6-8 cores ivy later are MUCH more promising and worth of waiting...
    sure many softwares now don't have any gains with more than 2-4 cores, and when you start further increasing the core count like that some things start getting harder and harder to use it efficiently... but I believe that relatively speaking a sb-e will be much better 2-3 years from now compared to the 2600k (or an ivy bridge lga 1155) than what it is now for most things... so I still think is valid for most people to keep this possibility of an easier upgrade later... but yes, buying a new MB later is not a huge problem...
     
  3. denev2004

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    Well, At least its not worse, even it uses the old 32nm

    I think the goal of SnB-E Desktop is just as #32 said "
    I imagine that the primary point of this silicon is the Xeon edition and that the SB-E workstation edition is just something extra for them" So It sounds reasonable to be cheap.

    I agree 3770K is more attractive, but only by considering IGP, power consumption and ability in extreme overclocking
     
  4. HMBR

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    Anandtech tested the sb-e quad core,

    power consumption is quite good
    [​IMG]

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/5276/intel-core-i7-3820-review-285-quadcore-sandy-bridge-e/1

    so more and more I think this is the way to go if you need a 300 usd quad and want to use a 200 usd MB,
    much better upgrade possibilities (six core SB-E, probably eight core SB-E in the future? six core and eight core ivy bridge-e later in 2012 or ealry 2013 I think), PCIE 3.0 now, lot's of memory and pcie bandwidth... the lga 1155 i7 only makes sense now if you want a much cheaper MB, those priced at slightly more than 100 USD or less in my view...
     
  5. Dr Evil

    Dr Evil Anas platyrhynchos
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    I also think more and more (times two!) that 3820 is kind of pointless. If you need the features of the E-series you should get the 6-core edition and if not the Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge will do more than fine.

    Going for a high end chip and then cheaping out the cheapest possible motherboard sounds weird to me. The cheapest board at Newegg is 214$ at the moment... Better upgrade potential might not sound so hot when Haswell comes out in 2013 and requires you to change everything again.

    It was news to me though that this isn't the same die further disabled as in the 6-core versions, but a much smaller die, which helps explain the price.
     
  6. HMBR

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    the cheapest x79 board already offers more than the most expensive 1155 one in my view, so I don't think it sounds "weird", and even if the impact is not to significant I can see one wanting to use his HD7000 series CF at pcie 16x 3.0 instead of 8x 2.0 (or worse with more cards), and the upgrade possibilities for me is a factor... but at the end is quite simple, CPUs cost the same more or less (3820 vs 2600K), AND if you are planing on spending something around the price of a X79 MB... seems logical to me...
    but if you want a cheaper MB, I don't see any mistake in going for the 1155 i7.
     
  7. Lightman

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    Or another option if you want PCIe 3.0 is to get S1155 board with PCIe3.0 and wait few months for 22nm refresh. I've done exactly that. Rocking 2500K for now and when time comes I will jump on to 22nm CPU which will enable PCIe3.0 for me. By that time hopefully nVidia will release their new cards as well and in effect HD7970 will fall in price a bit.
     
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