Polygons, voxels, SDFs... what will our geometry be made of in the future?

Discussion in 'Rendering Technology and APIs' started by eloyc, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. eloyc

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    I understand what you mean. It's just I don't think this is a case for proper comparison, since everything is very stylised on that video.
     
  2. JoeJ

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    That's maybe the problem here: Some researchers discuss their recent work, eventually make some promises, hype train takes notice and... whoo! - the usual hype before release practice has moved over from game dev to research.
    I did not read the whole paper because the motivation section failed on me to say what problem they try to solve. Tracing octrees is nothing new, and they did not make clear what compression advantage against something like SVO or DAG they achieve. Model quality is not impressive to me.
    The twitter posts don't help either - showing a huge model but only at a single scale, so it's not clear what's the detail. Promises of AI revolutionizing everything are just that.
    This sounds like a nothing burger to me. Thus i ask, because i certainly miss something or get it all wrong.
     
  3. manux

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    It's the breadcrumbs that lead into future. It's rare everything would change in one instance. It's more likely that things happen brick by brick. That specific paper is one brick building towards future. The biggest thing in that paper for me is two fold. One is the compression achieved which can be significant. Another important thing is the results are workable as training material for other neural nets. If you want to do some movie scale rendering using a bigger farm the compression can make work distribution/memory usage much nicer.

    One could for example wonder how mass storage space limited unreal5 engine is going to be. Neural representation even just for static objects could be a huge game changer.

     
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  4. JoeJ

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    Sure, but usually if you do some first steps, those are simple at first, so it's clear what is happening and easy to explain. E.g. Pac Man is less complex than modern games.
    Now i have missed referenced works from the paper, but use of ML in geometry processing is not entirely new to me. Followed some papers about shape matching / manipulation, segmentation, or procedural generation for example.
    This paper however lacks any detailed explanation. It is basically just a report about their claimed results.
    It surely is entirely limited by storage, thus my interest.
    Thus also my worries, because any solution for fast rendering, lighting etc, likely has a strong dependency on the data structure and format, which may be very custom and hard to adapt.
    If ML can do seriously better compression / quality ratio than anything else and workflow is fine too, we should know better early than late. But promises and claims without backing are more distracting than helpful.
    Well, we'll see the upcoming gfx conferences. Maybe it will clear up after some time...
     
  5. manux

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    Maybe you can try asking the authors in twitter? They seem to be tweeting a lot.
     
  6. SlmDnk

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    Quite an improvement over the previous ultra-blocky engine revision...



    [​IMG]
     
  7. MfA

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    It's more a question of having all these mm2 and TFLOPs of matrix multipliers hanging around any way.
     
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