Astronomy and space exploration

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by eloyc, Apr 10, 2017.

  1. jayco

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    Fixed that for you. Musk visa allowed him to study in the US, not to work (he founded Zip2 back then). Also, I'd say that this is finally happening thanks to different admins, Bush administration paved the way for commercial cargo missions, Obama started the crew program, and Bridestine is hiring private companies to develop lunar landers. Space is probably one of the few fields where there is a lot of bipartisan agreements.

    BTW, I don't wanna spam or anything but I did a little montage about the mission. The video is not monetized or anything, I just like space thingies.

     
  2. eloyc

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    Nice! ^_^
     
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  3. hoom

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    Another Rocketlabs launch
     
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  4. eloyc

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    https://www.machinedesign.com/mecha...ars-converts-co2-into-organic-building-blocks

    There are a few other experimental projects out there trying to convert CO2 into oxygen. This could have uses here on Earth, as well.
     
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  5. hoom

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    Rocketlabs failed in 2nd stage at or maybe a bit before battery hotswap.

    Doesn't necessarily mean anything but significantly more glitchy feed than other launches.
     
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  6. pharma

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    Nuclear blast sends star hurtling across galaxy
    July 15, 2020


    [​IMG]
    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53415294
     
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  7. zed

    zed
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    https://www.theguardian.com/science...comet-neowise-spectacular-journey-in-pictures
    [​IMG]
    Ive looked a couple of nights, and could bearly see it with the naked eye (much worse than the above photo)
    Speaking as someone who remembers the great disappointment of haley's comet back in 87 ........ this was even more disappointing :razz:

    Take the following foto, shot close to where I was looking the next day. WTF theyre not even using a super long exposure, what I bearly saw was about magnitude 4-5

    [​IMG]
     
    #607 zed, Jul 20, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
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  8. nutball

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    I looked for it last night, which was the first non-cloudy evening here for nearly two weeks. I couldn't see anything.

    Some of my colleagues have managed to take some decent photos though over the past week or so. The combination of light pollution and a light cirrus or haze can play havoc with visibility of such things.
     
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  9. eloyc

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    The launch of UAE's Mars mission was a success:


    Let's hope it arrives well and everything works as expected (or better!).
     
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  10. zed

    zed
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    True but the thing is I could easily see all 7 stars of the big dipper (least bright 3.3) and a lot of stars of magnitude 4.0+ quite clearly, shows the magnitude was between 4-5. The only thing I could see of it was out of the corner of my eye a little bit of a smudge, If I had no idea it was there I would never of noticed it
     
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  11. eloyc

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    https://www.space.com/multiplanet-system-sun-like-star-first-photo.html

    Amazing!

    And now one of my questions: if they can directly image planets from a system 310 light years far away from us, why can't they do it in more detail with Proxima Centauri or other planetary sistems way closer to us?
     
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  12. Davros

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    Maybe this is why
    "The two newly imaged planets are huge — 14 and 6 times more massive than Jupiter."
     
  13. eloyc

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    Yes, I took that into account. However, mass =/= size (even though yes, of course it usually means bigger), and so many other variables.

    At any rate, if you can image a planet 10 times bigger than Jupiter, so to speak, can't you image one the size of Jupiter at a 90% closer distance?

    I'm way too impatient for these things. :grin::grin::grin:
     
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  14. Davros

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    Maybe this is why
    "TYC 8998-760-1b is about 14 times more massive than Jupiter and orbits at an average distance of 160 astronomical units (AU), and TYC 8998-760-1c is six times heftier than Jupiter and lies about 320 AU from the host star. (One AU is the average Earth-sun distance — about 93 million miles, or 150 million kilometers. For comparison: Jupiter and Saturn orbit our sun at just 5 AU and 10 AU, respectively.)"
     
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  15. eloyc

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    Yes, I know. I'd like to know better, though. :mrgreen:
     
  16. Lightman

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    This is amazing!
    Imagine what we could find if we had this sort of telescope on the Moon or in space where there is no atmosphere!

    Can't wait to buy my ticket to the Moon when they start selling them for under $1k :D
     
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  17. eloyc

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    I don't know if we will go to the Moon, but I'm sure we'll live to witness the birth of tourism there, as well as telescopes, etc. <3
     
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  18. nutball

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    The size of the planet is only one factor in the feasibility of direct imaging. The main drivers are the contrast ratio (brightness difference) between the planet and its host star, and their angular separation on the sky as seen from Earth.

    Basically what you are trying to do is image something extremely faint which is very, very, very close to something extremely bright. Think ... staring at the floodlights of your local sports stadium, then holding up a cigarette lighter in front of it and trying to see the flame. As you move the cigarette lighter out of the direct line of sight to the floodlight, it becomes easier to see. The coronagraph helps, in that it massively reduces the amount of light we see from the host star. This would be the equivalent of, say, holding up your hand to block most of the light from the floodlights. It improves the observed contrast ratio, but nevertheless this is still only partially effective, as you can see from the image in the article,

    The planet orbiting Proxima Cen is orbiting at 0.04AU, compared to 160 and 320 for the planets in that system. This is well within the pattern of residual light from the host star in that image, and hence impossible to detect.

    There are fundamental physical limits to the resolution of any telescope, driven mostly by the size of the mirror. Interferometry can dramatically improve spatial resolution, as the effective aperture is then determined by the separation of the individual telescopes. I think that interferometry is being used in this study (sorry, I've not read the paper!) as that is one of the unique capabilities of the VLT. Likewise the atmosphere gets in the way, so adaptive optics are also a benefit. A space-based interferometric array of very large telescopes equipped with coronagraphs would probably have a chance of imaging an Earth equivalent, but as I'm sure you can imagine funding for anything like that is a long way off (2040+).

    One last note is that direct imaging is more or less orthogonal to other techniques for detecting exoplanets (eg. radial velocity and the transit method). Direct imaging is most sensitive to planets very distant from their host star, whereas the other techniques are most sensitive where the planets are very close in. With current technology it is more or less impossible to directly image RV/transiting planets, and impossible to use RV/transits to say anything about planets such as these. The point of this being that as things stand it's not really possible to image planets that we have prior knowledge of. It's more of a fishing expedition using a lot of telescope time.

    Anyway that's my brain dump. Sorry if it's none too coherent, I'm hungover and haven't had my coffee yet this morning!
     
  19. eloyc

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    Thank you for your detailed explanation! :smile2: I'm familiarised with all that stuff but I'm not an expert and sometimes it's difficult to put it all together.

    I hope your coffee did you well, by now. :lol:
     
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  20. eloyc

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    Space Warp Dynamics changed its name to Quantum Electro Dynamics and announces they have more than doubled their previous results. They'll post some videos this weekend.
    https://www.facebook.com/QEDNebraska/
     
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