Your next monitor should be

Scott_Arm

Legend
My 19" CRT did NOT like non-native resolutions, it went blurry as or generated nasty moire.
I don't miss CRTs at all.

Rewatching the OP video I have to suspect these guys have been only using 'gaming' type TN LCDs, I've never noticed all this blur stuff they talk about on my IPSes.
Maybe I just don't play the kind of games where it shows up/its been there & I don't notice.
I definitely didn't like the one 1080p TN type I bought & quickly switched to a 1920*1200 IPS when I found one at the right price.

At a fundamental level I don't miss sitting infront of an xray generator regardless of how good the filters/voltage protection are.

CRTs don't have motion blur or ghosting. They have pretty much instant colour response, so there's no ghosting. They are not sample and hold displays so there is no motion blur. Both ghosting and motion blur are unavoidable on TN, IPS, VA panels. Even OLEDs avoid ghosting but still have motion blur. The only way to eliminate motion blur on sample and hold displays is to have some type of flicker to lower the persistence of the image (backlight strobing, black frame insertion) or to increase the refresh rate and frame rate (500 fps @ 500 Hz). CRTs don't have motion blur because they're impulse driven and the image is only shown for a short period of time before the image decays and then the next image is drawn.

CRTs have their own problems though. But in some ways they were superior, especially for gaming.

https://testufo.com/
I guarantee you will see blurring on this test, blurring that will decrease with higher fps. Even on a 240Hz with very low ghosting, I still cannot make out all of the details on the ufo perfectly in motion. There are little patterns of white dots on the ufo, and each group of three dots looks like one large dot at 240fps for me.
 
CRTs don't have motion blur or ghosting. They have pretty much instant colour response, so there's no ghosting. They are not sample and hold displays so there is no motion blur. Both ghosting and motion blur are unavoidable on TN, IPS, VA panels. Even OLEDs avoid ghosting but still have motion blur. The only way to eliminate motion blur on sample and hold displays is to have some type of flicker to lower the persistence of the image (backlight strobing, black frame insertion) or to increase the refresh rate and frame rate (500 fps @ 500 Hz). CRTs don't have motion blur because they're impulse driven and the image is only shown for a short period of time before the image decays and then the next image is drawn.

CRTs have their own problems though. But in some ways they were superior, especially for gaming.

https://testufo.com/
I guarantee you will see blurring on this test, blurring that will decrease with higher fps. Even on a 240Hz with very low ghosting, I still cannot make out all of the details on the ufo perfectly in motion. There are little patterns of white dots on the ufo, and each group of three dots looks like one large dot at 240fps for me.

I think he's talking about blurring when inputting certain resolutions and not blur during gaming.

My CRT produces a blurry image when I feed it certain resolutions and refresh rates.
 

Scott_Arm

Legend
I think he's talking about blurring when inputting certain resolutions and not blur during gaming.

My CRT produces a blurry image when I feed it certain resolutions and refresh rates.

I was responding to him saying he doesn't notice blurring on his IPS, which most definitely has ghosting and motion blur.
 

hoom

Veteran
Sorry, yes imprecise language: Static image eg Windows desktop/browser text got blurry on the CRT at non-native res.

I guess I see that motion blur effect on fast moving stuff on my LCDs but its never seemed like a bad thing, never anything like the nasty stuff I've seen videos of from TN/VA type screens.
 

xz321zx

Newcomer
Afaict the preceding analog circuitry in CRTs were never up to the task of multisync and this conveniently explains how TV's and early monitors "got away" with ~60hz for so long, it was better done with tight retrace and easily done with low effort "peaking" circuits. On the other hand for multisync monitors and projectors this task is as daunting as it gets. Note I don't consider g-sync/freesync a true solution either (patents serve as indication why).
 
Even in the late 80's and early 90's I don't recall ever owning a PC monitor that didn't support at least a 72 Hz refresh. The reason that most PC monitors were quick to adopt at least a 72 Hz refresh rate (often far higher for anything but a really budget monitor) was due to potential eye-strain for some people that were sensitive to perceivable "flickering" due to the strobing nature of a CRT. This was especially troublesome and made significantly worse if you had fluorescent lighting (common in most office environments). Under those conditions most "decent" monitors were capable of 100+ Hz refresh.

If you had a good IT guy, he'd ensure that all the computers were set to 72 Hz or higher. For me anything lower than 72 Hz would induce some serious eye strain and potential nausea when working at a computer for any length of time. 60 Hz presented discomfort within minutes. I preferred having my PC refresh the display at 100 Hz or higher as that ensured that even an extended work session wouldn't induce discomfort.

LCD's didn't suffer from this problem due to sample and hold versus the strobing nature of a CRT. While sample and hold isn't great for gaming, it was a godsend for work activity. Not having to worry about whether or not a PC I sat down at was configured for 100+ Hz refresh was fantastic anytime I had to use a PC that wasn't my own.

NOTE - LCD displays that use PWM to adjust brightness can introduce a similar eye strain effect if the frequency of the backlight is reduced far enough that the strobing starts to affect your visual system. Not everyone is sensitive to this. Unfortunately I am, so I try to avoid any display that uses PWM to adjust backlight brightness.

Man, it's been about 2 decades now since I've had to worry about whether or not some customer's or co-worker's PC was set to refresh the display at lower than 72 Hz. I'd almost forgotten about it.

Regards,
SB
 
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xz321zx

Newcomer
Well yeah that's the hamfisted explanation procured by PC guys, meanwhile all TV and even military literature has 60 hz, because these guys were beyond quantifying flicker as a single number from start and set up tight timing/ retrace.
 
I'm not sure what you are trying to say? When you say "early" monitors, how "early" do you mean?

In the 80's multisync CRT monitors were already pretty common. Granted at the start they could only switch between multiple fixed frequencies, but it wasn't long before they supported a continuous range of frequencies.

Prior to the 80's multisync wasn't really needed on CRT as display outputs were fixed on computer systems and most displays were purpose made for a given computer design. It wasn't until PC's started to increasingly support multiple graphic formats in the 80's (CGA, EGA, VGA and especially SVGA made it desirable for PC displays to be able to handle multiple resolutions and refresh rates) that the need for multisync monitors arose.

While EGA was backwards compatible with CGA, VGA wasn't. And SVGA introduced the ability for one display card to support many different scan rates. Thus the need for monitors able to support multiple scan rates arose and thus multisync monitors very quickly entered the market. It wasn't any difficulty WRT to implementation that prevented them from appearing much earlier, there was just no need for it prior to that point.

Regards,
SB
 

Gubbi

Veteran
Three things generally determine the capabilities of your CRT:
Aperture grill dot pitch
Horisontal scan frequency
Video signal bandwidth.

I had a Philips 202P40 with .24mm dot pitch, 130KHz horisontal scan frequency and 280+MHz video bandwidth.

Stuff looks blurry if you're pushing the video bandwidth limit, or if the CRT is out of focus.

I could run it at 2048*1536 @ 75 Hz, 1600*1200 @ 100Hz, 1024*768@120Hz and regularly ran it at 320*200@200Hz for competitive QuakeWorld matches (with software rendering, no less).

So while it didn't support variable sync, you could set resolution to fit your temporal resolution demands.

Cheers
 

orangpelupa

Elite Bug Hunter
Legend
Unfortunately I am, so I try to avoid any display that uses PWM to adjust backlight brightness.

for some reason lots of manufacturers still use PWM. Even oled screens on phones / tablets still use pwm.

I fortunately cannot see pwm flicker but I do feel nauseated when the pwm frequency is too low. Not sure how low is too low tho.
 

orangpelupa

Elite Bug Hunter
Legend
You write 'still', as if implying there is a practical power-efficient alternative...?

Some use dc dimming. Lenovo legion y700 use dc dimming.

Not sure how big the effect to battery life tho. My laptop use dc dimming. But I can't simply replace the screen with something else and test
 
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