Your next monitor should be

Discussion in 'PC Hardware, Software and Displays' started by Davros, Sep 20, 2019.

  1. Davros

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    Drumroll......
    A CRT


    I remember seeing a 21" trinitron for £12 in a local pawn shop I could of cried
    I lusted after one for years but they were over £1,000 at the time.
     
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  2. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    Some of the flat screen CRTs near the end were amazing, I still prefer the color vibrance and intensity on them.
     
  3. Pressure

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    Rose tinted glasses ... they weren't sharp and sucked for reading. The corners were worse and colours suffered greatly.
     
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  4. hoom

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    What ever happened to that tech that was a flatscreen made up of basically a mini-CRT per pixel?

    Finally got rid of our last 19" CRT we've had sitting around for years a couple of weeks ago.
     
  5. Jugix

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    Cost and patent issues AFAIK.

    https://www.goodgearguide.com.au/article/357585/canon_signals_end_road_sed_tv_dreams/
     
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  6. hoom

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    Yes SED is the one.
    Thats a shame it died, it seemed like a really neat tech.
     
  7. nutball

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    TBH I don't miss CRT at all.

    I had a pretty decent CRT monitor, 19" Iiyama I think, which cost me a fortune at the time. I spent forever faffing with the controls, linearity, even went in to the engineering menu to make additional tweaks. It was good, and better than most, but nowhere close to my current LCD.

    Granted cheap modern LCDs look like arse, but then so did cheap CRTs. Unfortunately when it comes to displays there's not really a good substitute for spending more money.

    AND I HAVE SO MUCH DESK SPACE NOW!
     
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  8. ToTTenTranz

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    No.
    Just... no.
     
  9. Rodéric

    Rodéric a.k.a. Ingenu
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    There's nothing like LCD when it comes to working (reading) though...
     
  10. AlphaWolf

    AlphaWolf Specious Misanthrope
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    There were some things my old 22" trinitron did better than my lcd, like keeping a boat from drifting in the wind. You need to buy a fairly large tv to get to 40Kg these days.
     
  11. Scott_Arm

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    CRT had some advantages, but god they had some limitations. Good luck adjusting the display output, but on a basic level the amount of space they take up and the amount of heat they produce.
     
  12. swaaye

    swaaye Entirely Suboptimal
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    I wish my LCD did a noisy, colorful degauss on power up. :(

    And I learned what Moire is thanks to the CRT. :)

    But hey I was experimenting with 120Hz in 2000.
     
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  13. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    MOIRE! Thank you, I forgot that word. :D
     
  14. DmitryKo

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    There are very good professional 4K monitors with PVA/MVA panels, which have excellent sRGB colors - but somewhat lacking in Rec.2020 colors gamut and peak brightness.
    I have a BenQ PD3200U at work and it's absolutely stunning, even though it only has sRGB - which made me believe that good factory calibration is much more important than inflated 'gamut' and 'contrast' numbers.

    The newer DisplayHDR certified monitors should be above average in this regard, though still not up to high-end QLED and OLED televisions.


    But surely most of these so-called 'gaming' monitors, especially those with cheap low-quality TN+film LCD panels, have very mediocre color quality, well below the boundaries of sRGB gamut, quite awful viewing angles, and introduce very large color uniformity errors, so they are far worse than good CRT displays of the past. Avoid these at all costs, no matter how many stupid 'Hz' or 'dynamic contrast' or whatever they advertise.

    The problem with CRT monitors is they cannot display anything higher than 1280x1024 pixels with a decent quality, even on very big and rare 19-21" professional models that weight quite a lot, and their peak brightness and contrast ratio is also not very good by today's standards. Not to mention they stopped making them about 20 years ago, so by now you can only find very old and used CRT displays.
     
    #14 DmitryKo, Sep 26, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2019
  15. xz321zx

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    Understandably, CRTs were way out of their niche as a commodity, and if we were to single out the venerable TN because non-uniformity, IPS contrast non-uniformity vs. viewing angles should be mentioned - commonly referred to as glow, or emissive displays next to unsolvable per pixel near black non-uniformity. Actually the TN issue is sort of solved by Sharp: https://patents.google.com/patent/US20170003545
    My "3ms" IPS panel has disconcerting inversion issue, and next to unusable in dark setting because of glow, altogether I'm not sure LCOS type perfomance is coming to flat panels.
     
  16. Rodéric

    Rodéric a.k.a. Ingenu
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    Aren't most problems solved by OLED?
    (except cost perhaps)
     
  17. Silent_Buddha

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    When you consider the cost of implementing a backlight that can attempt to get close to the blacks of OLED, then cost is favorable for OLED. If per pixel blacks aren't desired and a person can live with LCD backlight bleed and halos, then cost starts to shift the other direction.

    In other words, the cost of the panel itself is certainly cheaper for LCD. The cost multiplier comes in how advanced you want the backlight to be. Since OLED is an emissive tech, there is no need for a backlight.

    This also means color uniformity is far better for OLED, especially at comparable costs as there is no need to deal with diffusers in an attempt to get a few backlight zones to light the panel as uniformly as possible.

    Regards,
    SB
     
  18. Scott_Arm

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    The only issues I'm aware of with OLED:
    • it's a sample/hold display, so it has motion blur without black-frame insertion or some kind of strobing
    • ABL
    • burn in
     
  19. xz321zx

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    https://www.radiantvisionsystems.com/blog/mura-mura-wall
    Current LCD backlight can be partitioned into wide horizontal single pixel "tall" lines, doesn't seem too expensive thing to do, and blank lines can be turned off completely. Seems just the thing for mini/ micro LEDs , and better than a 2160 zone "full array" . With 6x less luminance transmitted vertically, its 6x brighter HDR.
     
  20. milk

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    Well, that way you minimize horizontal bleed, but do nothing for the vertical one. Any bright object over a dark bg would have a full column of lighter color above and bellow it. Kind of like a 90° tilted J.J. Abrams Lens Flare.
     
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