US Air Force Buying Another 2,200 PS3s

Discussion in 'Console Industry' started by thambos, Nov 25, 2009.

  1. thambos

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    http://games.slashdot.org/story/09/11/25/0527205/US-Air-Force-Buying-Another-2200-PS3s?from=rss

    interesting stuff. i wonder how they're running linux on the slims since sony removed the OS option in the newer firmware.
     
  2. Phil

    Phil wipEout bastard
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    Intesting indeed. Sony will love this. Too bad they aren't making a profit on hardware yet....

    or maybe, they're setting up all these 2200 PS3s to get a Modern Warfare 2 lan party going. War propaganda FTW. :wink:
     
  3. Crossbar

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    It´s not slims, if you follow the links:

     
  4. thambos

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    which link? i didn't see anywhere in either article. is it in the .doc?

    you're probably right. unless sony makes an order just for them w/ older firmware, or gives them firmware to flash with.

    i assumed they were slims because the article said

     
  5. ChryZ

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    Stop stealing my cynicism.
     
  6. Crossbar

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    This link which is found in the original article.
     
  7. Blazkowicz

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    why not just hack the DRM :razz:
     
  8. makattack

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    If there's one thing about my experience (in the past) with US Government procurement based projects... their processes are such that only proven technology is used... many times, to the point where they rely on obsolete, but proven technology -- and go through great lengths to ensure supply / maintenance of those items. I remember in 1993/4, a project I worked on was a cutting-edge development that was on a special "fast track" -- as such, we got to use such exotic and esoteric technology such as the Intel 80286 processor or 8088 microcontrollers -- that was when our desktop computers were at least 486 or in my case, 68030 based (I had a MacSE), and I believe the Pentium (original) was just rolling out.

    BTW, that project with the 8088 microcontrollers (a variant of the 8086) controlling a TI 320C26 DSP (my baby), was in some ways... similar in architecture, on a macro-level, to the CELL/CBE design with the PPU/SPUs... only, instead of heterogeneous cores, we had heterogeneous processors on the same PC board... it's funny how, as the French say, the more things change, the more things stay the same... oh, and I know it's not classified to say this, but it was a cryptographic project. The CBE's make for a great crypto platform. I wish I had one of those back in 1993...
     
    #8 makattack, Nov 25, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 25, 2009
  9. Blazkowicz

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    maybe that 286 had to survive radiations in case of a nuclear war.
    in a similar vein, the automatic pilot in your plane runs on five 386 board, and hubble's 386 was replaced ten years ago with.. a 486!
     
  10. makattack

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    Exactly. Real-time, fault-tolerant systems depend on proven, time-tested, cheap parts. I can't address the EMP or even the Tempest questions, but it would be safe to assume that those systems sat in a hardened/protected area.
     
  11. Gradthrawn

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    Part of me, the part that flies, is scared to even Google that to verify it. :lol:
     
  12. makattack

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    Frankly, I feel more comfortable with that fact... I'd rather not have it such that the flight controls (in a Fly-by-wire plane) were written by a programmer who just "learned" how to code on the latest/greatest CPU -- a CPU that hasn't gone through multiple revisions to sort out bugs in the microcode...

    That said, software is... fallible... maybe I shouldn't use a word with "fall" in it, in this case.
     
  13. patsu

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    I think it may depend on the needs. They already have 336 PS3s deployed before. This is just an expansion.

    The cluster is used for:
    "The Air Force has used the cluster to test a method of processing multiple radar images into higher resolution composite images (known as synthetic aperture radar image formation), high-def video processing, and "neuromorphic computing," or building computers with brain-like properties."

    Doesn't sound like a system in the field unless they are building Skynet.
     
  14. Blazkowicz

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    sure, you already can get ridiculous purely software bugs. I remember reading about a fighter aircraft that rolled and went belly up when finding itself flying below sea level. This would be an uncomfortable situation (can't even dare trying ejecting yourself :lol: )
     
  15. archie4oz

    archie4oz ea_spouse is H4WT!
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    At this point, the just liquidating old hardware that isn't likely to sell is a nice win. Chances are either the losses were already incurred in a previous quarter thus the subsequent quarter gets a nice bonus of revenue seemingly out of nowhere, or the anticipated writedown becomes less because hardware that wasn't moving suddenly moves instead of incurring the costs of sitting in inventory.
     
  16. Crossbar

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    The PR-value of that order is worth plenty.
    USAF must be a dream customer to Sony to show off the power of Cell. :cool:

    I´d expect a lot of news sites to pick up that story.


    Don´t know what to make of this though:
    Upcoming Cell chip customer?

    The suggested radar application reminds of one of the Transputer applications.
    Anyone else remembering the Transputer?
     
  17. Blazkowicz

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    they could use Spurs for some real time processing.
    else I don't believe we'll see PS3 hardware on the battlefield. That recalls the ridiculous Saddam Hussein's Playstation 2 guided missiles story.

    here is it :)
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2000/12/19/iraq_buys_4000_playstation_2s/

    no comment on that :lol:

    duh
     
  18. Shifty Geezer

    Shifty Geezer uber-Troll!
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    Well, XBox hardware is activate on the battlefield.

    At least, according to UK military recruitment advertisements, a UAV is piloted on an XB360 controller! :D
     
  19. Blazkowicz

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    microsoft was always known to be good at input devices :razz:
     
  20. sunscar

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    You'd be surprised (possibly) to find that to be the norm. Most the items flying in space are older process node components a lot of people today would call junk. Larger components are less prone to failure when struck by a stray atomic nucleus travelling close to the speed of light, and thus more reliable. If we started launching 32nano stuff up right now, it'd likely be dead within six months or less. Heavy shielding doesn't help much either - that one stray nucleus becomes a shower of other particles when it hits the shielding, turning a bullet into a shotgun blast aimed directly at the electronics.

    So people may actually wish to give a sigh of relief, instead of a grimmace that what goes into the air is usually running something forgotten since antiquity.
     
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