Unreal Tourn. on my new P-M 725 runs way too fast..-FIXED

Discussion in 'PC Gaming' started by zsouthboy, Feb 5, 2005.

  1. zsouthboy

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    I figure it has something to do with the processor throttling down to 600 mhz while the engine sets up some timing values....

    Any ideas on how to solve this? Some sort of "default" timing value I can through in the .ini?

    Thanks

    (Trying to change the "game speed" back to 50% helps, but it's still about 2 times as fast as it needs to be.... I'm going to try starting the game with 400% and move it back....)
     
  2. zsouthboy

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    Okay going into the settings and changing game speed to 200$ and exiting, then restarting and changing back to 50% helps a lot, but it's still not wuite there.

    None of my other games seem to do this btw...
     
  3. Zaphod

    Zaphod Remember
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    Try setting the power profile to 'always on'. Some games are not equipped to handle the changing clockspeed of mobile processors.
     
  4. Guden Oden

    Guden Oden Senior Member
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    This is lousy programming. No game should use the CPU speed for timing purposes, I thought programmers cut out that horseshit when the 2D sidescrollers became obsolete on the PC.
     
  5. zsouthboy

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    That fixed it! Thank you !


    (I do agree that it's bad programming, but, I mean, the game came out in like 1998)
     
  6. Ostsol

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    Well, the CPU tick counter that some modern engines use for timing is divided by the number of ticks per second. Unless the wrong value for the tick frequency is being reported, there should be no problem.

    EDIT: Eh. . . nevermind. . . If the CPU speed changes dynamically, then the result certainly could be that the game would have to try and detect that change and query the tick frequency again. It's not a matter of lousy programming, merely out-of-date programming. I doubt that such dynamic hardware was around when UT was released.
     
  7. Humus

    Humus Crazy coder
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    Using the clock cycle count for timing means you get as finegrained timer as you possibly can, and it's very cheap to read it as well, so there are good reasons to use it. You may need to poll the CPU speed occasionally to adjust for the changing clockspeeds though.
     
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