UE5 Timeline; When will other games release using Unreal Engine 5? *spawn*

zed

Legend
It's solid, easily. A triple A game takes around $50-100 million today, but that's for the entire game, art and design and qa and all, over the course of say, 4 years. Even if Epic spends the higher end of that literally just on the engine alone, that's just $25 million a year. Costs beyond that are going to be relatively minimal in comparison. So, sure, it's not Fortnite. But over a hundred million a year in after tax profits would be a good product even for Apple, let alone anyone else.
"Looking at Unreal Engine, Epic only saw $124 million in revenue during 2018 and $97 million in revenue"
From what I can see 2020 was $100 million. Mate they have >1000 employees OK a lot are working on fortnite and other things but I really don't see the engine being a big profit earner
Apples revenue was 2,745 times larger than Epics engine was in 2020. Picking some random mundane thing -> 'Ice cream cones' made magnitudes more revenue than epics engine in 2020 , sure for you and me 100 million revenue is heaps but for a big company its chump change.

Mate I was shocked how little it brings in, its the biggest engine used in the world by far, used in a string of high profile titles so like this guy I was expecting like 5-10x more
https://www.quora.com/What-generates-more-revenue-for-Epic-Games-Fortnite-or-Unreal-Engine
"Epic doesn’t releases exact numbers, but annual revenue from liscensing the Unreal Engine is probably somewhere in the ballpark of a billion dollars (give or take fifty percent)"

FWIW Unities revenue in 2019 was more than 5x Unreal Engines
 

cheapchips

Veteran
I was more referring to smaller studios like Flying Wild Hog. They already abandoned their engine and moved to UE4 for the latest Shadow Warrior. It seems like the larger publishers are safe but you never know. I certainly wouldn't want a repeat of the PS3/Xbox360 era where UE3 was just everywhere.

I always thought UE3's ability to only render brodudes was one it's strangest technical limitations. :)

Flying Wild Hog 's comments on the engine switch were interesting:

...we are really, really proud that we were able to actually make and develop the engine at the same time we were doing the games. So it was an awesome success for us, but it came at a cost. We needed to have a really big engine team and it was always like you were chasing the rabbit because there was the CryEngine, Unreal Engine, Unity. And we saw that the gap between this huge Epic team making new cool stuff, adding features to their engine, and our 10-people engine team who's trying to keep the base, the gap was getting larger and larger. So a year and a half ago we decided to actually switch to Unreal Engine 4. I think it was the first I would say mature decision we made with Supernova's help because we understood that we were kind of driven by the sentiment that we have to have an engine because, you know, father issues, but in the end they had us understand that what we really want to do is to focus on making games, experimental gameplay, original, explosive fun. And Unreal Engine 4 is great for that, it's super flexible. It's actually much easier to prepare prototypes than it was in Roadhog. So we have much more space for experimentation there. It was something huge for us.

I'm wondering about your games in development. Did you have to switch engines in the middle of the development phase? And was it hard, changing from the Roadhog engine to Unreal Engine 4, or was it seamless?

Honest, honest answer. Yeah, it was hard, but maybe in a little different way than you would expect; it wasn't hard in terms of, you know, technology or tools. It was hard because, for many years, our team was used to use our own engine. And seriously, many, many of our employees were unhappy because of the decision. Because it was our engine. We were one of few studios in the world that actually could make awesome games using their own proprietary engine, so it was more like a psychological problem or difficulty than it was in terms of technology. In terms of technology, in a few months, we actually remade all our prototypes and our games into Unreal Engine 4, so it wasn't difficult. But you know, even after a year and a half of working on UE4 with few projects in development, with really awesome stuff we created, we sometimes still hear in the corridors that it was cool when we were doing something in Roadhog because this particular thing was a little easier to achieve in the old engine. Sentiments die really slowly.

That's understandable. But, you know, at least that's what I heard from other developers, Unreal Engine usually speeds up development in most cases.

Totally agree.

https://wccftech.com/flying-wild-ho...p-to-hint-two-game-reveals-scheduled-in-2020/
 

SlmDnk

Regular
I recently played through Unreal and Return to Na Pali again and have been dreaming of a Unreal reboot on UE5.

I think it would suit the game perfectly. Just imagine how a faithfully enhanced Unreal would look, feel and sound...
 

Kaotik

Drunk Member
Legend
Foundation isn't the only engine CD use. Guardians used Dawn (Deus Ex) but it's hard to see them keeping that around as well.
Crystal Dynamics used Foundation only. Guardians of the Galaxy, which uses Dawn like you said, was developed by Eidos.
 
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cheapchips

Veteran
Crystal Dynamics used Foundation exclusively. Guardians of the Galaxy, which uses Dawn like you said, was developed by Eidos.

Good point! They were muddled under the wrong umbrella in my head. I'll pretend I never said it (twice). :D

I'll pretend that I think all western Square Enix studios will switch to UE5.
 

DieH@rd

Legend
UE5 is just a name, devs can still use it and not touch any of the newly added flashy features.

We will probably get few UE5 games out this year, but all of them will be using old rendering techniques taken from years of UE4 development. As for Nanite&Lumen games, they are years away [and will most likely be 30fps-only on consoles].
 

chris1515

Legend
UE5 is just a name, devs can still use it and not touch any of the newly added flashy features.

We will probably get few UE5 games out this year, but all of them will be using old rendering techniques taken from years of UE4 development. As for Nanite&Lumen games, they are years away [and will most likely be 30fps-only on consoles].

Nanite is 60 fps ready they told it after the first PS5 demo on PS5, the problem is Lumen and Coalition told in a presentation one of the solution for 60 fps on Lumen side is to lower Epic settings to Ultra settings on consoles. And since this presentation, I suppose UE5 performance improved but the most expensive part of Ue 5 is Lumen not Nanite...
 

PSman1700

Legend
They had that demo running at 40fps on a 2080maxQ, the engine defenitely should be able to go above 30fps even on lower end hardware with lumen/nanite.
 
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