Thermal grease consistency...

Discussion in 'PC Hardware, Software and Displays' started by Saem, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. Saem

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    6
    I've got an old tube of AK-100 thermal grease lying around, except the consistency seems off. it seems as if it's separated, with parts of it being a rather runny liquidy cloudy white and other parts being more like a paste. Just wondering if this is normal?
     
  2. stevem

    Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2002
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    3
    Yes, that's normal for this type of compound. Just make certain to mix the entire contents thoroughly prior to use. In a thin layer at an active junction it won't separate.
     
  3. Saem

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    6
    Okay, so from what I remember, I haven't done this in a while.

    Apply the paste on the contact surface of the HS/F, give it a big of a stir in this case to clean up the consistency

    Move it on to the CPU, make sure the spread is good, try to keep it a thin layer (due to the high pressure retension mechanism)

    Then wipe of any huge blobs outside of the contact area.

    Double check.

    Then you're done?
     
  4. Saem

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    6
    The retension mechanism is so tight that there barely seems to be a film, craziness, guess I'm just not used to this.
     
  5. stevem

    Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2002
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    3
    Arctic Silver has useful guides on their site. Your product is most similar to their ceramique solution.

    You will need to completely mix the entire contents of the tube prior to use, not just a small amount squirted out from the tube. Otherwise, you cannot be sure that you have correct proportions of the constituents.

    I find it best to apply a small drop to the core & use a thin, flexible strip of plastic film to uniformly (& thinly) coat the surface. I then fit the heat sink. You can also apply a small amount to the heatsink & rub it in as per AS instructions, but I've found trivial difference. Some people like to use applicators or craft shop rollers & mask off the die area as well as lap the HS. I can't be bothered...
     
  6. Frank

    Frank Certified not a majority
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Sittard, the Netherlands
    When seen under a microscope, a smooth metal surface looks more like the surface of the moon: full of craters and mountains. The idea is to fill the craters in both surfaces with the compound, so the whole surface is in contact with the other one.

    That little compound is nearly invisible.
     
  7. Saem

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    6
    Oh I realize that, but seeing is believing as they say.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Beyond3D has been around for over a decade and prides itself on being the best place on the web for in-depth, technically-driven discussion and analysis of 3D graphics hardware. If you love pixels and transistors, you've come to the right place!

    Beyond3D is proudly published by GPU Tools Ltd.
Loading...