Safe CPU temperatures?

Discussion in 'PC Hardware, Software and Displays' started by Deepblue, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. Deepblue

    Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    8
    So I've been playing a ton of Deus Ex: HR recently - love it to death - but I notice that unlike most other games I own it sends the CPU temperature in my laptop particularly high - so far peaking at about 65 degrees C. Should I be worried about serious hardware degradation from such temps? Is there anything I can do to keep it cooler?
     
  2. AlphaWolf

    AlphaWolf Specious Misanthrope
    Legend

    Joined:
    May 28, 2003
    Messages:
    8,414
    Likes Received:
    269
    Location:
    Treading Water
    You're nowhere near close to damaging your cpu. Probably at least 30 degrees away from needing to worry.
     
  3. Deepblue

    Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    8
    Heh, good. Because I just played around some more and saw it hit 74 deg C. Deus Ex seems to be particularly processor intensive.
     
  4. tongue_of_colicab

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    3,435
    Likes Received:
    643
    Location:
    Japan
    If you got a intel cpu (and amd probably as well) you can easily look up what intel thinks is the maximum allowable temperature on their website. Though the cpu can probably run quite a bit hotter than what intel recommands before really getting damaged.
     
  5. zed

    zed
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,422
    Likes Received:
    618
    yesterday (the CPU actually got up to 85o and fan at 2500), didnt notice it at all since its still near silent even when overheating :(
    [​IMG]
    since my PC wasnt able to communicate to the internet this happened.
    its a bug with
    1. the widget writer
    2. the Apple OS development team
     
  6. Deepblue

    Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    8
    Okay, now this is concerning me. I kept the HW monitor on for an hour long play session, and max CPU temp was 93 degrees. TJunction for my CPU is 100 degrees. That can't be good - how do I prevent it from getting so hot?
     
  7. zed

    zed
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,422
    Likes Received:
    618
    underclock your cpu?
     
  8. Lightman

    Veteran Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Torquay, UK
    Even if it gets to 100C it won't die. It will throttle CPU speed to cool down so you will experience uneven performance during that period of time.
    Long gone are days of CPU's burning out itself and everything close by. BTW what laptop do you have?
     
  9. Deepblue

    Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    8
    Asus U36SD. Weird thing is that as far as I know, Deus Ex is the only thing that gets the CPU as hot.
     
  10. Albuquerque

    Albuquerque Red-headed step child
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    329
    Location:
    35.1415,-90.056
    As Lightman described, the chip will not die, or burn, or otherwise damage itself at even 100*c. That TJunction indicator is where the chip will begin enabling throttling, but isn't the point where it's borderline smoking.

    Keep in mind that silicon doesn't burn for several hundred more degrees ;)
     
  11. Lightman

    Veteran Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Torquay, UK

    Small trick if you haven't tried it yet and your lappy is is good few months old. Get compressed air or powerful blower and clean air intake/exits from dust. You can easily gain 10C-20C better temperatures under load if there is a problem with air circulation :wink:

    BTW classic transistors will die depending on class anywhere above 150C-250C but modern CPU's are more sensitive than that due to doped silicon, strainers, etc. I'm not microchip designer, so can't say for sure, but going to 120C will shorten CPU life dramatically over even short period of time or kill it altogether.
    My old AMD Duron 600 survived a week of 110C+ (bad radiator mount) at the socket diode and worked fine for years. I'm sure internal temperature went close to 150C because all warranty stickers underneath CPU burnt to ashes.

    Anyway, I would not worry about CPU too much, worry about your family jewels if you're playing with laptop on your lap :smile:
     
  12. zed

    zed
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,422
    Likes Received:
    618
    whats wrong with underclocking it? (of course slower speed but most likely good enuf for the applications)
    IMO (*) the benifits (esp for a laptop) outweigh the slight speed lose

    wiki
    When a single-core Intel CPU was 20% underclocked, the PC’s performance was down only 13% with a 49% power reduction.[3]

    *Reduced heat generation, which is exactly proportional to the power consumption.
    *Less noise because the cooling fans may be slowed down, or even eliminated. A cooling fan’s efficiency is proportional to its rotation speed, but it noise grows much more.
    *Longer hardware lifespan.
    *Increased stability.
    *Reduced noise from cooling parts due to reduced heat dissipation requirements.
    *Increased battery life.

    (*) then again to me Ive unlike back in the old days, where getting a new faster CPU I could see instantly, everything was zippier, for the last few years I cant tell the difference (outside of benchmarks)
     
  13. Bludd

    Bludd Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    3,196
    Likes Received:
    764
    Location:
    Funny, It Worked Last Time...
    Try changing the fan policy from passive to active.
     
  14. arika

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I won't recommend testing your cpu's ability of how much hotter it can get.. lol.. I mean my computer had same issue and as a result it automatically shuts itself down. Plus it gets real slow and the speed is greatly effected. Mine heats up a lot too but I make sure the air vents out properly to avoid any issues :oops:
     
  15. Blazkowicz

    Legend Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Messages:
    5,607
    Likes Received:
    256
    You mean, without even opening the laptop up?
    That's a nice trick, to do with a spray can of dry air (I had trouble with these cans, people will waste them spraying into themselves, it gives a Vader voice for a few seconds)
    For older laptops I've thought of dismantling and going as far as changing the thermal compound (maybe need the sticky kind) you would need time and patience for that. On desktop CPUs esp. AMD ones this can be a huge deal.
     
  16. Lightman

    Veteran Subscriber

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Torquay, UK
    Yes, spray can do the job quite nicely without opening laptop, at least for most of them where air duct is straightforward. Some of them have nice and easy access to get to radiator/fan assembly and after cleaning it makes huge difference to temps.
     
  17. Grearlacte

    Newcomer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2013
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Since I live in a tropical country, the temperature is often hot and humid. Definitely not the kind of temperature that our computer needs. Aside from installing additional fan, I make sure that the electric fan is right in front of the CPU tower. There are even instances when I have to remove the cover of the case to make sure that it won't overheat.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Beyond3D has been around for over a decade and prides itself on being the best place on the web for in-depth, technically-driven discussion and analysis of 3D graphics hardware. If you love pixels and transistors, you've come to the right place!

    Beyond3D is proudly published by GPU Tools Ltd.
Loading...