PSone...what was the avg polygon count for the avg game?

Discussion in 'Console Technology' started by kenneth9265_3, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. Bohdy

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    Did any Ps1 games actually render at 60fps? What would be the point, considering that they could only work on interlaced TV's?

    Could someone clear this issue up for me?
     
  2. sunscar

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    Tobal #2 I think ran @ 60 fps.
     
  3. Shogmaster

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    Why do people still get hung up on this? You CAN show 60FPS animation on interlaced TV! Each field shows single frame of animation!

    Here's a similar post recently at GA that I answered the exact Q:

    Back to topic, anyone can tell me if ePSXe has a polys per frame counter and how to activate it? Or point me to a PSX emulator that has such an option?
     
  4. kenneth9265_3

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    Thanks Guden Oden! I have been trying to find that answer for years! :D

    No, I don't know a lot about programing or engineering, I am a adult gamer that have always been interested technology.

    It is amazing to me the progress of gamming and graphics from those software in seeing how far and fast it have progressed in the last 20years.

    I tend to find that learning about the past can help you know what ahead for the future, and technology tends to fit into this catagory. :wink:
     
  5. kenneth9265_3

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    Cool so from what I am getting from you guys is that the Playstation was pushing around 60,000-120,000 poly on the avg per sec for games? Thanks, you guys are the best!
     
  6. Bohdy

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    Shogmaster: Thanks for clearing that up. I had originally assumed that you could use different source frames for each set of odd/even fields but had been told that this would produce corrupted output in motion.

    Shows how little that person knew :-D
     
  7. notAFanB

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    on an related note did *any* PS1 titles every approach or exceed 180,000 Poly/sec?
     
  8. PC-Engine

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    Oh man I think we've gone over this a million times already. Some people can see the difference between 30fps games and 60fps games on interlaced tvs.
     
  9. AmazingFagit

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    You're all doing it wrong.

    If PS1 = 60 FPS with 20,000 polys/s = 333 polys per scene.
    If PS1 = 30 FPS with 20,000 polys/s = 666 polys per scene.

    Seems about right to me. 333 polys is pretty small when you think about it.
     
  10. insanepunkclown

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    It is amazing how few polygons were rendered back in the time... There was one late PS1 game that pushed the console to the limits, it looked like an early/launch game for the Dreamcast in terms of polygons, it was a shooter.

    I read somewhere(along time ago) that one game on Nintendo 64 managed 200K polygons per second...

    On Unseen64 there is an article on a GBA game that rendered 40+K polygons textured in actual gameplay which is insane and if it was flat shaded then I would't be surprised if it could render Sega 32X version of Virtua Racing at 45-60FPS though GBA has 240x160 resolution while PS1 games rendered at 320x240 which is twice as much pixels to render.
     
  11. London Geezer

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    Resurrecting an 11 year old thread must be a record on here!
     
  12. function

    function None functional
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    Wrong thread
    Records are made to be broken ...

    *goes looking for older threads*
     
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  13. Nesh

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    PS1 had many 60fps games. All Tekken games, Tobal 1& 2, Ergheiz, Rapid Racer, Dead or Alive, Forsaken, Klonoa, Einhander, Omega Boost (I think). Motor Toon, and I am sure there were many others too
    Which one?
     
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  14. insanepunkclown

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    Delta Force Urban Warfare... I know, it doesn't look pretty... Specially the textures, but the lightning well done and some environment is good. It is not Soldier of Fortune on Dreamcast, but if DFUW was a launch game then considerably better textures, solid frame rate and rendered at 640x480P.
     
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  15. Grall

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    I'd wager a decent sum that this is utter bollocks, I can't begin to imagine which game this would be. Most N64 titles struggled to even hit 30fps, so to hit 200k polys/sec would require hugely detailed levels (for its time). I know of no such game, it would be difficult to fit it on a cart to begin with due to storage requirements.

    This I also doubt very much, GBA had no hardware 3D acceleration to my knowledge, and a very slow main CPU. Doing 3D math in software is slow as hell unless you got some sort of on-chip vector math unit or similar like in Sega Dreamcast's SH4.

    Sounds like a PR spinmeister out of control, bullshitting on purpose in a printed magazine article, knowing they'd be likely to get away with it (people didn't have this internet thing back in the GBA days, or if they did it was not what it is today. Be glad if you're too young to never have experienced dial-up internet access! :D)
     
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  16. insanepunkclown

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    I don't know which game pushed that, I forgot. It was over a year ago...

    Though this game pushed (considerably?) more than average PlayStation game



    http://digitalfantasy.angelfire.com/n64-hardware-specifications.html

    Turbo3D microcode pushed 600K polygons at PlayStation quality(eg distorted textures) and it is naive that it would't fit on cart, specially when by late 90's there were compression methods for Nintendo 64 and carts were as large as 32MB and Resident Evil 2 was 64MB.

    [QUOTE="Grall, post: 1846164, member: 434"
    This I also doubt very much, GBA had no hardware 3D acceleration to my knowledge, and a very slow main CPU. Doing 3D math in software is slow as hell unless you got some sort of on-chip vector math unit or similar like in Sega Dreamcast's SH4.

    Sounds like a PR spinmeister out of control, bullshitting on purpose in a printed magazine article, knowing they'd be likely to get away with it (people didn't have this internet thing back in the GBA days, or if they did it was not what it is today. Be glad if you're too young to never have experienced dial-up internet access! :D)[/QUOTE]



    It is not 40K polygons, it is 45K polygons! My bad... Sorry.
     
  17. Nesh

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    It always boggled my mind how they managed to fit everything into a 64MB card and make it better. They say that the sound was also improved. I am not sure if they mean cleaner sounds or simply the inclusion of surround sound.
     
  18. Rikimaru

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    It was not better. Textures were worse. I do not think audio quality could be better too.
     
  19. insanepunkclown

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    1.) Its a cartridge. That's pretty sweet.
    2.) Highest quality music of all versions? Not sure.
    3.) Supports the console's Expansion Pak accessory for a maximum resolution of 640×480 during gameplay & adjusts its display resolution depending on the number of polygonal models currently on screen.
    How does that compare to the Dreamcast running at 60 frames per second during gameplay?
    4.) Other visual enhancements include smoother character animations and sharper, perspective-corrected textures for the 3D models.
    Smoother than the PS1 but smoother than the Dreamcast & GameCube also?
    5.) Alternate costumes, the ability to adjust the degree of violence and to change the blood color, a randomizer to place items differently during each playthrough, and a more responsive first-person control scheme. All of that sounds great, N64 your control scheme is more responsive? You sons of bitches.
    6.) 16 new in-game documents known as the "Ex Files. Damn I'm a sucker for extras.
    http://www.sega-16.com/forum/showth...nt-Evil-2-Dreamcast-Version-Vs-N64-GC-Version
     
  20. Nesh

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    Well the reference was about the PS1 vs the N64 version. So I dont think any other version would fit into the picture. The game shipped on 2 disks on the PS1 for God's sakes. They crammed up everything in a 64 Mb cartridge.

    Did the prerendered backgrounds look better i.e were they in higher resolution? (Not referring to the display output)
     
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