Magnitude and direction of change in velocity. Dont know how to get direction.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by shazam, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. shazam

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    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    [​IMG]

    2. Relevant equations

    I used:

    square root of: 196^2+236^2-2(196)(236)cos(45)

    to get the change in velocity of 169.4

    and then did 169.4/5 hours to get the average acceleration of 33.9

    3. The attempt at a solution

    i don't know what to do for the second one
     
  2. Blazkowicz

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    it's not 45°? :D
     
  3. KimB

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    I'd just resolve the vectors into components. It then becomes relatively easy to compute the change in direction, as it's a simple subtraction, from which the angle can be computed with an inverse tangent.

    P.S. I won't say the actual answer, but the change in velocity is greater than 90° west of north. As the problem suggests, drawing the initial and final velocity vectors will help to see this.
     
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