How not to subvocalize?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by weaksauce, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. weaksauce

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    This is just so dumb I can't believe it. Why do I have to ask how not to do something?

    Well I'm still gonna do it. Can you look at text without automatically subvocalizing the words? EXACTLY how did you get there?
     
  2. AlBran

    AlBran Ferro-Fibrous
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    I got there by reading a lot of books. *shrug*
     
  3. AlphaWolf

    AlphaWolf Specious Misanthrope
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    practice by reading while eating perhaps?
     
  4. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    Hum music while you read, and as Alstrong said practice helps.
     
  5. Bludd

    Bludd Experiencing A Significant Gravitas Shortfall
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    Funny, It Worked Last Time...
    Are you talking about moving your lips while reading or "internal speech"?
     
  6. weaksauce

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    Internal speech... Probably the only reason why people read slow.
     
  7. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    Do you actually say the words or just hear them? I do "hear" the words spoken as I read, but only in my mind.

    (DISCLAIMER: I'm an insanely fast reader)
     
  8. nutball

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    Do you read every word?
     
  9. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    Yeah, I don't do the "Evelyn Wood" method of speed skimming...I just read really fast.

    I used to read a ton as a kid. From age 10 or so and up to about 25 I was a total bookworm. It wasn't unusual for me to read like 14-21 books a week sometimes.
     
  10. weaksauce

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    Hm, well in that case, I think I've got my focus on the wrong thing here... :smile:

    By the way, can you read with Ed Strachar's "dolphin method"? You draw your look in an "S" pattern, and thus read in both directions. I find the subocalization to be an obstacle then, but I suppose you can come to ignore it and not stumble over the words.
     
  11. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    Never tried that, I prefer to read the words in the order the author wrote 'em...I figure they put 'em that way for a reason. ;)
     
  12. weaksauce

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    Well here's the thing I've begun to understand, that a writer does not write words, he writes ideas and points of which words are the building blocks, which do not, by themselves, convey any message.
    I mean it's like trying to see a wall, brick by brick. It's easier to see the wall if you widen the focus a bit.
     
  13. Citrous

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    That is true, but you will lose the beautiful detail of the hand laid brickwork and masonry.

    In this sense, I read in different ways depending on what I'm trying to accomplish. Pleasure reading of fiction usually involves me 'hearing' every word in my head, in order; sometimes in different voices.

    Reading for business is usually skimming over the jumble of words to pick out the important bits I need.

    ttfn.
     
  14. Davros

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    i wonder if people who have been deaf from birth subvocalise ?
     
  15. Fred

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    I think deaf people still subvocalize. They associate the movement of their hand with the friction they learned when reading.

    So if they sweep their entire palm over a text, somewhere in their brain they are interpreting it like it was successive lines of their finger tracing. So there is a natural order.

    I'd be curious to know how fast a pure mute can read though and the variance in it, thats an interesting question.

    AFAIK there is controversy about subvocalization. Many researchers disagree with the speed reading guys. Outright vocalization (lips moving) is a bad thing, but having it in the back of your head is almost impossible to get rid off, nor is it clear you want to minimize it to such an extent.
     
  16. Davros

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    why would they do that theyre not blind you know :D
     
  17. Gubbi

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    Sometimes the brickwork is exquisite:

    Cheers
     
  18. Zengar

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    You will usually subvocalize automatically, as the text you read tends to activate your phonological loop (a brain system responsible for auditory processing of the language). Still, it does not matter. Just don't pay any atention. You can read much faster then the vokalization speed, the trick is just to do it :) It is similar to avoding internal monologue (thinking without words). Once you don't pay attention, it does not matter.

    To make things clear, subvokalisation is not required for reading!
     
  19. _xxx_

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    Speed reading. I got there automatically by reading many, many books.
     
  20. RussSchultz

    RussSchultz Professional Malcontent
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    Speaking of Shakespear, I HAVE to subvocalize (or even vocalize) anything I read from him (or any of the more modern stuff written in vernacular, like Huck Finn).

    Otherwise the words written just don't form coherent thoughts to me
     

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