Documentary on Lance Armstrong

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by wco81, May 23, 2020 at 11:55 PM.

  1. wco81

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    On the heels of boffo ratings for The Last Dance, ESPN is going to air a 2-part look at Armstrong, starting this Sunday at 9 PM EST.

    They've teased some clips, with him talking about why he took EPO.

    He seems to have dropped off the public consciousness after he finally admitted to doping a couple of years ago.

    Someone referenced how the Live Strong following was a huge deal. Apparently had diehard fans who kept shouting down anyone who dared suggest Lance was doping. Of course it wasn't just the fans, it was Armstrong and his inner circle, who were very aggressive about defending him.

    Turned out to be all gaslighting.


    I was never a huge fan of cycling. I would watch some bits of Tour de France when it was on TV, though I would never actively look for it.

    But Armstrong was a polarizing figure. He came off as arrogant and dishonest to me for some reason, long before he was caught.

    Some Americans were touting him winning one of the biggest competitions in Europe, for nationalistic reasons. Jingoism wasn't pretty.
     
  2. hoom

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    Did he actually completely admit it?
    My recollection is the wording he used in the 'he admitted it' interview was carefully vague & could be interpreted as not admitting it.
     
  3. wco81

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    I think when he did, it might have been a lawyer saying so.

    Presumably in this documentary there will be interviews where he talks about it.

    Otherwise it won't be much of a documentary on the subject.
     
  4. Davros

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    #4 Davros, May 24, 2020 at 3:54 AM
    Last edited: May 24, 2020 at 4:10 AM
  5. wco81

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    Part 1 - intercuts present day, mostly interviews, with a narrative of his entire career, starting in high school, where he first made his mark as a swimmer, which led to triathlons and eventually cycling.

    A couple of the early interviewees kind of warns the filmmaker that Lance is going to try to "shape" the documentary to his purposes.

    Armstrong wins the world tour of cycling fairly early in his career, at age 21-22, in only his first or second year. But then finds himself falling behind the very next year as doping becomes prevalent.

    The way he depicts the decision to dope, there wasn't very much agonizing, if he wanted to keep competing, he had no other choice.

    Says he took EPO only for the '96 season and then came his testicular cancer diagnosis. Surgeries, including to remove cancer which had metastasized to his brain and chemotherapy put him out for a year. His first season back, barely got a sponsorship and didn't have any ambitions about the Tour de France.

    Then in '98, the doping scandal in the Tour de France.

    The '99 Tour was to be a new beginning for the Tour and for him on his comeback story.

    After the scandal of the '98 Tour, they changed the race, so that racers wouldn't be motivated to cheat. It was suppose to result in a slower race. Instead, it was the fastest Tour in history, won by Armstrong. His own agent suggested he take it easy on the final time trial with the yellow jersey because he was going to win it either way. Instead he went for it, resulting in the record time.

    As one journalist says, it's the most grueling event in the world and a racer who takes off a year for surgery and chemotherapy sets the world record? But everyone involved in the sport, including those who covered it, played up this story about beating cancer and beating the Tour. It made the sport explode, that is brought in a lot of money, so the UCI governing body heads looked the other way. After '98, they could not have another scandal again the very next year.

    So in the history segment, they build up this image of this hyper competitive individual, who was cocky even as a kid. But it may be far more simpler than that. In his early 20s, he had a house to himself on Lake Como, a place where millionaires and billionaires have villas. Meanwhile his 4 teammates crammed into a 3-bedroom apt. They trained in Italy and then did all the competitions throughout Europe. By age 24, he was designing a custom home, spending almost a million dollars for a lakefront pad.

    In other words, the sports was lucrative to him since high school -- he traveled outside the country most of the year starting at age 17. He made great money even before he won his first Tour, before Americans knew about the Tour. But when he won it in '99 and kept winning them, he says he was at a superstar level, like Michael Phelps or Lebron James.

    He wasn't walking away from that in his late 20s or 30s. He says that most of the riders weren't scared to take EPO, alludes to taking the right amount and that it wasn't detectable. So pretty easy decision.
     
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  6. hoom

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    Imagine the reaction that'd have happened if he'd been Russian...
     
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