DIY eGPU for miniPC

Discussion in 'PC Purchasing Help' started by dA_KiDMaN, Jun 24, 2020.

  1. dA_KiDMaN

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    My composition:

    #Aliexpress Mini PC Intel Xeon E3-1505M v5 4 Core 8 2,80 GHz Server PC Barebone Win10 Pro 16GB DDR3L AC Wifi 4K Mini DP HDMI
    https://a.aliexpress.com/_BTGaKw

    #Aliexpress Yeston RX 550 4G D5 Radeon 4GB GDDR5 128Bit 6000MHz DP1.4HDR + HD2.0b + DVI-D small sized GPU
    https://a.aliexpress.com/_B1cyaE

    My project:

    Hi mates. I want to go away for a hardware minimalist upgrade project. I'm searching a good solution for adding an external GPU to my miniPC. In AliExpress I found an adapter for adding an external PCIEX16 connector attached to m.2 PCI x4 M-KEY.

    Doubts:

    My question is, do that kind of adapters using always a PSU?

    eGPU Radeon graphic card consumes 50wat only. I found a model of m2/pciex16 supplied by sata connector. This one: #Aliexpress 32G/bps PCI-E 3,0 16x to M2 M.2 NVMe key-M, 2230, 2242, 2260, 2280 Riser Card Gen3.0 Cable PCIe x16 extensor Sata Power X6HA
    https://a.aliexpress.com/_BSyIBy

    Could I use 12v 4pin Sata input adapter to be supplied directly from my miniPC sata
    Bay? I mean, if my Radeon eGPU will work without external feed 6pin pcie, could it be connected with only 12v extensor Sata power?

    could that damage my miniPC? SATA HDD internal bay is able to supply 12v? To avoid using a different PSU for graphic card, Could I find a 19v adapter for supply the additional power consumption?

    Many thanks people.
     
  2. ToTTenTranz

    Legend Veteran

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    I don't think the SATA power output can drive anywhere near 50W, it's probably closer to 10W. The PCIe NVMe connector probably can't drive more than those 10W either.
    I'd say there's no way you can feed an external 50W GPU with the power supply from that mini-pc.

    At the bottom of the miniPC's aliexpress page there's an option for an external GPU add-on, and that comes with a dedicated PSU.

    It's not a matter of voltage, it's a matter of electrical current.
     
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  3. Davros

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    Do you want to game on that thing or do you just need an additional monitor output ?
     
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  4. dA_KiDMaN

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    So I'm confused about my electricity concepts. Voltage x Amperage=Watts

    If I found a power adapter 19v with enough amperage to supply ae 190W .
    19v x 10A = 190W.

    The addition of GPU (50W) and miniPC (?W) it's not enough to overheating power supply. I mean total power consumption of the components is lower on that way.

    As I'm concerned about, wattage is relevant for source feed, not depends on where is connected. Not same for voltage... that it's transform at any terminal port in the PCB.
     
  5. dA_KiDMaN

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    Yeah, I want to make a minimalist project for a few utilities included gaming, but not. most important thing is to get a thing that broadcast' professionals call render station, or something like digital signage for TV channels. Sorry about my ENG
     
  6. dA_KiDMaN

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    PCI-e x16 cards can draw up to 5.5A x 12v (66W) through the PCI-e connector (6pin) The sata plugs can only supply 4.5A x 12v (54W) I don't know if it is exactly for miniPC integrated SATA cable.

    Founded from PSU:
    6-pin PCI-e Power cable is rated for 75 watts/13 amps, the same amount given by the PCI-e lane on the motherboard.

    Molex is rated for 132 watts/11 amps.
     
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