Best 4K HDR TV's for Scorpio/PS4 Pro

Discussion in 'Console Industry' started by Rangers, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. Tkumpathenurpahl

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    I can:

    Hello Frodo! What's taters?
     
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  2. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    Maybe you were fishing for this response I dunno, but...*ahem* :lol:

     
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  3. Tkumpathenurpahl

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    I absolutely was. Thanks :yes:
     
  4. nodixe

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    This is a very valid point before we factor power usage into the equation. If we can achieve relative dynamic range using less electricity we should definitely be trying to do so and oled helps alot (an oled w/700 nits max hdr has the same contrast ratio (ie: dynamic range) as a theoretical 4000 nit sony z9d). But I dont believe in limiting product manufacture (or inovation) because it exceeds some arbitrary max power usage guideline.

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
     
  5. London-boy

    London-boy Shifty's daddy
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    Sorry but that makes no sense. OLED might have higher contrast ratio, but ultimately when you see an HDR image mastered and showed on a theoretical 4000 nits (or even 2000 like the ZD9) it will always, always look better than on an OLED at 600-700 nits max, even with its theoretical infinite contrast - as good as an OLED looks overall, it’s just not enough yet for HDR.

    The issue here is that the difference between 700 and 2000 nits is huge in terms of the ‘spectacle’ of HDR. And there is a real diminishing returns kicking in from 2000 to 4000, for example, and so on.

    Speaking of ZD9, there are reports that at the end of the year, Sony will have the ZF9 ready for release, which will get to 4000 nits, among other things.
     
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  6. Jupiter

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    Even the shown 85inch 8K has no 4000 cd/m² and no thousands of zones. The shown model has only "hundreds" of zones and reaches 2000 cd/m². This was clarified on request. The 4000 cd/m² are just what Samsung believes they can achieve in the future. The thousands of zones were rather the LEc elements, but they are not individually controlled.

    https://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1515774068

    In addition, the manufacturers should also focus on motion sharpness with Hold Type movements always look after 300p and that interferes with extreme. Currently the pictire is either dark and sharp or muddy and bright if one excludes an Iiterpolation with120fps

    EDIT:

    In terms of brightness movies are relatively dark because they are made for the cinema. High brightness levels are rare in cinema movies and more used in television or video games.
     
    #946 Jupiter, Jan 13, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
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  7. RobertR1

    RobertR1 Pro
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    People got Samstung at CES again? lol
     
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  8. RobertR1

    RobertR1 Pro
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  9. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    Be a lot more what? Not expensive, I hope... :p
     
  10. London-boy

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    Count on it.
     
  11. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    But why... It's just LCD and LEDs. That's not extreme tech. Also, overly expensive TVs aren't exactly a huge market; is up really a way Sony would want to go?
     
  12. London-boy

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    Full array with hundreds of individually controlled lights, done right, is quite elaborate. Sure there’s a premium for being the flagship model but it’s also not exactly simple tech.
     
  13. Grall

    Grall Invisible Member
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    Meh... LEDs controlled like regular LED array displays commonly seen in public spaces, with input being luma values of the current frame being displayed, I should think. Not exactly space-age tech... More like, a couple decades old in essence; just repurposed for HDR usage.

    While more LEDs will be costlier, mostly I should think, it's the premium vs. edge lighting we're paying for - it's better, so it has to cost disproportionally more money. Good ole capitalism tax.
     
  14. RobertR1

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    OLED were the promise, not for the black levels but for the cost to manufacture reduction.

    LCD with FALD is not a cheap solution or you would have seen it become common place over the years. Anyone making a FALD with high amount of zones will have a high cost to produce meaning a higher street price.

    (real) MicroLED is the only thing on the horizon that can help but that is a few years away, at best. That's from a technical feasibility standpoint. Then you still have to reduce it's cost to produce to remain competitive.

    Making halo sets for CES without any respect to budget, mass scale feasibility or power draw creates for great demos. For me, this CES has actually be quite disappointing as most of the manufacturers decided to show off distant dreams while staying quiet on what's actually coming out.

    Maybe IFA will surprise us or you're stick until CES 2019.
     
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  15. ultragpu

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    It's because there are hardly any decent HDR capable projectors reaching high enough nits in the cinema. You know ever since the inception of HDR blu rays, I've found at least a whole bunch of them that looked significantly better than their theater counterparts. Pacific Rim, BVS, Wonderwoman, The Revenant, IT and Interstellar are just some of the prominent examples for me. I have to credit to the high brightness of HDR and wide color gamut that really make the pictures pop more, a vastly superior contrast and inkier black. I think the future of cinema experience will be focusing on HDR based projectors as the contents are shot and optimized more toward that high brightness eye popping experience.
     
  16. ultragpu

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    Agreed. The sheer amount of high brightness would not only bring it to match the actual intended UHD HDR spec limit "4000 nits", color volume would also be drastically increased as a consequence. Adding a few more individually controllable zones in that already capable Backlight Masterdrive we would reach that Oled blackness level ever so closer but without issues of near black detail loss, burn ins or ABL. I just hop it's still 4k and 3d capable:).
     
  17. RobertR1

    RobertR1 Pro
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    3D isn’t coming back. It’s time to be realistic.
     
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  18. RobertR1

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    One of the areas that didn't get a lot of attention was the rollup TV's that LG showed.

    It's my belief that the next change in buying habit won't come from peak brightness but from the aesthetic and convenience factor of a "TV on demand"

    In 3-5 years, the rollable OLED's should be just another SKU. The difference will be around a few key areas of size and convenience that will make them highly desirable.

    Size first because there is a logistical problem to having a very large set shipped, delivered and positioned in a typical house. The challenge is further compounded in Europe where smaller homes are the norm. Sending the unit rolled up makes it easier to transport, get through the door and most importantly, you have have a very large screen that doesn't dominate the living room when it's off. That's an important appeal to many people that shouldn't be overlooked. Imagine a 85 or 98inch traditional TV in your room now. Chances are it would dominate the room and when you're not watching TV, it's just a giant black screen taking up a *lot* of space. Now imagine having all that space fully reclaimed as soon as you're done watching the TV. Couple that with families not worrying about kids damaging the unit or the cleaner applying a cleaning detergent and a variety of other issues you solve by having your TV essentially put away when not in use.

    The convenience factor is around the form factor lending to varied placement options. For a larger size, why roll up when you can roll down? Reclaim ALL the living room space by ceiling mounting the unit and having the screen come down in a projector like fashion but without the complicated install. So now imagine your living room without even a hint of TV because it's tucked away in a ceiling unit.

    I hope LG's continues to work hard to deliver the rollable OLED's and make them commonplace in the coming years. It'll likely replace my current set.
     
    #958 RobertR1, Jan 14, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
  19. ultragpu

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    I thought Imax still has a healthy batch of 3d movies rolling in routinely no? And what about those Avatar sequels :)?
     
  20. Tkumpathenurpahl

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    I'd be interested to see if sales of 3D Blu-rays and cinema tickets are still high enough to indicate demand. Personally, I've always quite liked 3D, but it's certainly not for every film, and clearly not for every person.

    One issue, is that you eventually just "tune out" of its 3D nature unless it throws things at the camera. That's fine, but it becomes a tired trick quite quickly. I think 3D combined with head tracking is the way to go, as that would provide you with enough interaction to continually register depth, but that's a near insurmountable technical hurdle for screens.

    If anyone wants to see an example of what I'm on about, there's an old video on YouTube, where a man with the voice of Kermit the frog straps a Wiimote to his TV, and the IR emitter to his head.

    I'll try to find it. Back soon!
     

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