Arrrggghh!!! What is the correct chemical name for water?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by g__day, Apr 5, 2004.

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  1. g__day

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    This is bugging my wife and I now - any takers with a chemistry background?

    The contestants include:

    Di-hydrogen Monooxide
    Di-hydrous Oxide
    Di-hydrogen Oxide
    Di-hydrogen Oxygen
    Oxidized Hydrogen
    Oxidized Hydronium
    Oxidized Di-hydronium
    Hydrogen Oxide
    Hydrogen Hydroxide
    Hydrohydroxic acid
    Di-hydronium Hydroxide
    Di-hydronium Monooxide
    Di-hydronium Oxygen

    Amazing that in an age of Google we can't seem to get and answer, even from a popular US website (able2know) with a chemistry section we don't have agreement!

    Does anyone here absolutely know the correct chemical name for simple old H2O?
     
  2. epicstruggle

    epicstruggle Passenger on Serenity
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    hydrogen dioxide?
     
  3. RussSchultz

    RussSchultz Professional Malcontent
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    No, that would be HO2
     
  4. epicstruggle

    epicstruggle Passenger on Serenity
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    thats what i get for posting after a double shift. :(
    later,
    epic
     
  5. rabidrabbit

    rabidrabbit A Reformed Member
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    Di-hydrogen Mono-oxide
    ...i quess

    H2 (di-hydrogen)
    O (Mono-oxide)

    ...not sure though :oops:
     
  6. Tim Murray

    Tim Murray the Windom Earle of mobile SOCs
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    I thought it was dihydrous monoxide. but whatever.
     
  7. rabidrabbit

    rabidrabbit A Reformed Member
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    Dihydrous monoxide sounds good. Better than Di-hydrogen Mono-oxide :)
     
  8. epicstruggle

    epicstruggle Passenger on Serenity
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  9. mondoterrifico

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  10. davefb

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  11. akira888

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    It's not "Dihydrogen monooxide," just as you wouldn't call H2S "Dihydrogen monosulfide" but rather "Hydrogen sulfide." (Its' real name) Whenever hydrogen forms a covalent bond with a nonmetal the nomenclature excludes numerical prefixes; therefore, it's actually "Hydrogen oxide."
     
  12. davefb

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  13. Sxotty

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    Akira they are right and you are wrong, but it is no big deal :).

    That is because acording to you than hydrogen peroxide (h2o2) would be name hydrogien oxide. The naming conventions and what things are actually called are different of course b/c water is water :). But if it only has one oxidation state like h2s then they shorten it to hydrogensulfide.
     
  14. bloodbob

    bloodbob Trollipop
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    The answer is water I'm pretty sure. Though while we are adding names of what it could be Hydronol and Dihydrogen ether.
     
  15. B&R

    B&R
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    DiHydrogen MonOxide. I think you need to have a loss of electron(??) or hydrogen for it to be called hydrous.


    Damn this brings the horrors of chemistry days to me.
     
  16. PC-Engine

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    Octet Rule
     
  17. digitalwanderer

    digitalwanderer Dangerously Mirthful
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    I'm not sure yet, but I think it's gonna drive me wife a bit nuts now that I showed it to her. :) (She's a pharmacist and it's bugging her now. :lol: )
     
  18. Bambers

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    always thought of it as hydrogen oxide myself. :|


    Still if one thing is for certain its that sulphide and sulphur etc is spelt with a ph and not an f ok? :p
     
  19. speng

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    It's simply Hydrogen Oxide.

    H2O

    You need 2 hydrogen atoms for the one oxygen to make it stable.


    Think of Hydrogen Chloride...HCL. Since Chlorine has 7 atoms it only needs 1 Hydrogon to form the cloride.

    With Oxygen it needs 2...H20 Hydrogen Oxide.

    Just like the Bromides, Chlorides, Sulphides...ides hehe...


    Speng.
     
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