AmigaOS4.0 feature set release 1

Discussion in 'Beyond3D News' started by Saem, Jan 16, 2003.

  1. Saem

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,532
    Likes Received:
    6
    The AmigaOS4.0 feature set release 1 has been offically made public as of the 13th of January 2003. The authors warn that the OS and hence documentation are subject to change; thus, one should not take anything metioned in the document as set in stone. You can find the document in HTML format here and the PDF format here, and the full press release here.
     
  2. BoardBonobo

    BoardBonobo My hat is white!
    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    3,255
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    SurfMonkey's Cluster...
    I always thought that the AmigaOS was a masterpiece of software design. The kernel and support libraries were some of the best thought out designs of the time. I'm glad to see that it is still alive and kicking, it's just a shame that Commodore made so many silly mistakes during the lifetime of the Amiga.
     
  3. Thowllly

    Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2002
    Messages:
    551
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Norway
    Shush! Don't say that! Now Democoder is going to kick your ass for your ignorant views!
    :)

    I hope my PPC equipped Amiga is still working...
     
  4. RussSchultz

    RussSchultz Professional Malcontent
    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2002
    Messages:
    2,855
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    HTTP 404
    I just loved the non protected kernel of AmigaOS. It made for such a stable environment.

    /flamebait

    Seriously, though. How can you call the "AmigaOS" a quality kernel? Maybe the API was easy to use and well thought out, but the guts of it sucked arse because of the lack of protected memory spaces. While you could technically blame that on the 68000, they certainly didn't fix that on new versions. From 2000, they're still making excuses for living in the past.

    http://www.amiga.com/press/zine/6-3-00/AW2.6.htm

    From my little high horse here as software developer, I say this is a piss poor design decision (Unless, of course, you're designing something like a STB where the end user isn't installing all sorts of software on there). Whether or not its in the current AmigaOS4, I don't know. But if it is...they're certainly not aiming for any business to adopt them.
     
  5. BoardBonobo

    BoardBonobo My hat is white!
    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    3,255
    Likes Received:
    153
    Location:
    SurfMonkey's Cluster...
    Aah, but I speak out of an old sentimentality. At the time it trounced Windows (2.0? or 3.0). Multi-user, multi-tasking. Proper interprocess communication, it had a lot going for it then. Maybe now it's kind of dated and admittedly their idea of non protected memory is a little bit scary, but as I remember the '030 hadn't yet been released with the original version and neither had the MMU.

    At the time it had a quality kernel, that's what I should have said. But it was features like split screen resolutions, dragable screens, and more than four garish colours on the desktop that I thought were elegant.

    But then again I still have an Amiga 4000 at home. I even went out and bought a NeXT machine. :roll: , I just liked that era of computing I guess :D
     
  6. Mariner

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2002
    Messages:
    1,604
    Likes Received:
    242
    Hey - don't bash the NeXTs!

    At the time they were miles ahead of PCs (Windows 3!!!) or the Macs (stability).

    We still have a fully functional NeXTstation in the store at our office and another PC runs NeXTSTEP. The interface now looks a bit primitive compared to WinXP and the like, but it is 10 years old, after all!
     
  7. WaltC

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    BelleVue Sanatorium, Billary, NY. Patient privile

    Back in the late 80's and early 90's the Amiga OS was not unusual regarding its lack of memory protection. Not only that, it was a far better OS than any consumer-space personal computer had to offer. When Byte magazine did its cover story on the Amiga 3000 (I think 1991--but don't hold me to that) they said, quote unquote..."The Amiga OS contains probably the best exec ever written for a personal computer OS", among other extremely flattering things (Well, that's pretty close, anyway.)

    I actually have a functioning Amiga 4000 Toaster system at home. I can still do multitasking feats on it that my AXP, WinXP, Radeon 9700P system (or my wife's) simply cannot do--or else chokes on. Interprogram communication processes using AREXX program ports worked phenominally well on the Amiga--and I've got a whole class of modular programs of a type that still aren't available for x86, or if they are--at nowhere near the price for the same approximate level of performance and/or features--and on x86 today we're still talking basically a single tasking environment after all is said and done.

    Don't misunderstand me--I won't go back to the Amiga--but I can't bear selling it, either...;) To me it represents a "golden age" of personal computing that we'll never see again, and I do remember it fondly.

    Sure, by today's standards the lack of MP sucks--no doubt about it. Although the Amiga was great at PMT, it still was never multithreaded, either. But even so, it was literally 10-15 years ahead of Microsoft and Windows. Ah, what might have been...

    I haven't looked at the "new Amiga" stuff simply because it's not the "old Amiga" and as such holds little interest for me. I do wonder however if they aren't eschewing MP for the sake of being backwards compatible with the old software--which I would think any software Amiga today would have to be to hold any interest for anyone. The clods that ruined Commodore, like Mhedi Ali, are gone today; but so are the geniuses like David Haynie (whom I once told, after Commodore imploded despite his best efforts, that I would buy any computer he ever designed! Hopes were high as he struggled to get a new box out of the door, circa '95-'96, but I don't believe it ever happened....:(....)

    The old magic is gone...in its place we have this cold, mechanoid, implaccably commercial "borg" environment that's taken a lot of fun out of it all. But still, there are some exciting things going on currently which can get me pumped up still...

    Ah, poor Amiga...Alas, I knew him well...or I knew him not at all. (No applause, just throw money.)
     
  8. Anonymous

    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 12, 1978
    Messages:
    3,263
    Likes Received:
    0
    walt, in case you haven't already, check out beos. apropos, here's an online version of the bebook (the text on all beos APIs) - take a look at it, too.
    http://bang.dhs.org/be/bebook.html
     
  9. darkblu

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    2,642
    Likes Received:
    22
    *must .. remember .. to login .. in the news forums!..*

    above post is mine.
     
  10. Anonymous

    Veteran

    Joined:
    May 12, 1978
    Messages:
    3,263
    Likes Received:
    0
    NeXTSTEP

    I loved the ability to rapidly prototype an application. Interface Builder was really cool because of its Objective-C codebase; but NetInfo was very finicky and pity the sys admin who didn't think through the planning of your domain heirarchy, especially in pre 3.2 NeXTSTEP. But it was an amazing little community of loyal users willing to share whatever info available to keep it alive. The Black cubes were the epitome of cool. And who could forget the NeXTWORLD expo's. Those were the days...
    I just tossed my sys admin manual, my developers binder and assorted software (NeXTime, EnterpriseObjects, etc.) last November...couldn't come up with any more reasons to keep them...but it was sad.
     
  11. Mariner

    Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2002
    Messages:
    1,604
    Likes Received:
    242
    Yep - the development environment was good. I actually did my University project on NeXTSTEP and the development environment and I created a little address book programme without many problems even though I'm a crappy programmer.

    The only decent work I did at University and it got me a reasonable degree!

    Problem was, it was never going to beat the marketing power of Microsoft and, to a lesser extent, Apple. At least some of the tech lives on in OS X (I believe?).
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  • About Us

    Beyond3D has been around for over a decade and prides itself on being the best place on the web for in-depth, technically-driven discussion and analysis of 3D graphics hardware. If you love pixels and transistors, you've come to the right place!

    Beyond3D is proudly published by GPU Tools Ltd.
Loading...