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digitalwanderer
21-Apr-2005, 20:57
...."aluminum" like it's supposed to be pronounced?

My bro just mentioned it in a thread over at EB and it got me wonder, why do the brits put an extra vowel in there? :|

EDITED BITS: Changed it to accomodate the max title length limit.

The549
21-Apr-2005, 21:05
I thought that was the correct way to say it?

Frank
21-Apr-2005, 21:09
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium

Farid
21-Apr-2005, 21:11
(L. alumen: alum) The ancient Greeks and Romans used alum as an astringent and as a mordant in dyeing. In 1761 de Morveau proposed the name alumine for the base in alum, and Lavoisier, in 1787, thought this to be the oxide of a still undiscovered metal.

Wohler is generally credited with having isolated the metal in 1827, although an impure form was prepared by Oersted two years earlier. In 1807, Davy proposed the name aluminum for the metal, undiscovered at that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum. Shortly thereafter, the name aluminum was adopted to conform with the "ium" ending of most elements, and this spelling is now in use elsewhere in the world.

Aluminium was also the accepted spelling in the U.S. until 1925, at which time the American Chemical Society officially decided to use the name aluminum thereafter in their publications.

digitalwanderer
21-Apr-2005, 21:15
(L. alumen: alum) The ancient Greeks and Romans used alum as an astringent and as a mordant in dyeing. In 1761 de Morveau proposed the name alumine for the base in alum, and Lavoisier, in 1787, thought this to be the oxide of a still undiscovered metal.

Wohler is generally credited with having isolated the metal in 1827, although an impure form was prepared by Oersted two years earlier. In 1807, Davy proposed the name aluminum for the metal, undiscovered at that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum. Shortly thereafter, the name aluminum was adopted to conform with the "ium" ending of most elements, and this spelling is now in use elsewhere in the world.

Aluminium was also the accepted spelling in the U.S. until 1925, at which time the American Chemical Society officially decided to use the name aluminum thereafter in their publications.
OMG, I had no clue there was really an answer...thank you! :)

Farid
21-Apr-2005, 21:22
OMG, I had no clue there was really an answer...thank you! :)
You're welcome, Digi. :D

pocketmoon66
21-Apr-2005, 21:39
...."aluminum" like it's supposed to be pronounced?

same reason why you dropped a u from colour, spell minimised as minimized and why people leave in Pittsburgh rather than Pittsborough

:) :) :)

_xxx_
21-Apr-2005, 21:58
And they go to the theater instead of theatre...

digitalwanderer
21-Apr-2005, 22:04
Really?

The one that kills me is "sed-jewel" for "schedule".

Hmm, mebbe I should start saying "aluminium" then to better annoy friends and family....it'll go well with me whole "bloody" kick. ;)

RussSchultz
21-Apr-2005, 22:08
they're actually saying "shed-jewel", which is about right for the letters that are there.

Chiner, however is not how China is pronounced.

digitalwanderer
21-Apr-2005, 22:10
Also, is "left-tenant" an actual military rank over there? :|

Bouncing Zabaglione Bros.
21-Apr-2005, 22:25
Also, is "left-tenant" an actual military rank over there? :|

Yes - because we speak English, not American:

"The Americans are identical to the British in all respects except, of course, language."
Oscar Wilde

"We (the British and Americans) are two countries separated by a common language."
G.B. Shaw

MasterBaiter
21-Apr-2005, 23:24
Hehe a silly question that didn't seem so silly after hearing the answer. :D

The hood of a car in the UK is called a bonnet, and french fries are chips. Silly gits. :wink:

Gerry
21-Apr-2005, 23:54
Funny, because I've always thought, why do yanks pronounce the word "aluminum" instead of how it should be pronounced.

Strange world isn't it?

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 00:18
Strange world isn't it?
Yup, but that's what keeps it from getting boring. ;)

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 00:21
Why don't donkeys fly? Usually?

Guden Oden
22-Apr-2005, 00:26
Chiner, however is not how China is pronounced.
How about "'murrica" then? :D

K.I.L.E.R
22-Apr-2005, 00:29
The rest of the world also spells "nite" as "night". ;)

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 00:31
Chiner, however is not how China is pronounced.
How about "'murrica" then? :D
What about murrica?

I presume you're referring to "america". I don't know anybody who pronounces it as "murrica", though, so I'm kinda scratching my head.

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 00:32
The rest of the world also spells "nite" as "night". ;)
Its only spelled 'nite' in product names, as far as I know.

K.I.L.E.R
22-Apr-2005, 00:42
The rest of the world also spells "nite" as "night". ;)
Its only spelled 'nite' in product names, as far as I know.

Why? I don't get that. :?

Killer-Kris
22-Apr-2005, 00:49
The rest of the world also spells "nite" as "night". ;)
Its only spelled 'nite' in product names, as far as I know.

Why? I don't get that. :?

Easier to copyright perhaps?

nutball
22-Apr-2005, 07:58
We're right and you're wrong basically! :D It is called English after all :)

Simon F
22-Apr-2005, 08:21
Why do brits say ...
And Aussies, Kiwis....

I just typed Aluminium into "Google translate" and German and French also seems to use "Aluminium" though not Spanish, Portuguese and Italian, where it's more like "al(l)umĂ*nio".

Simon F
22-Apr-2005, 08:24
Hehe a silly question that didn't seem so silly after hearing the answer. :D

The hood of a car in the UK is called a bonnet, and french fries are chips. Silly gits. :wink:

I think the correct way to say it is that in the US (and Canada?) the bonnet is called a hood etc, because other English speaking countries also use the former.

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 09:36
Why am i gay and not gaee?

Mariner
22-Apr-2005, 09:43
One of my pet peeves is when people in the UK pronounce "schedule" in the American way (i.e. sked-ool). Regrettably the correct (i.e. English :P ) way of saying the word is dying out and many people here don't even realise they are just aping what they've heard on American TV programmes. :(

One of my other pet peeves is the way Americans pronounce the word "herb" as "urb". It's got a bloody letter H in it, for heaven's sake! :roll:

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 09:47
Well the other day i had a discussion with my colleagues because i was adamant that skeptical was written with a "k", simply because i've been speeling it like that in MSWord, which will autocorrect you if you write the proper English way, which is sceptical.
Made me so angry!! My PC (and word) is set up on UK English, but it autocorrects this and many other words into the American (wrong) spelling. And because of that i will always spell skeptical the wrong way, with a K.

Gerry
22-Apr-2005, 09:56
One of my other pet peeves is the way Americans pronounce the word "herb" as "urb". It's got a bloody letter H in it, for heaven's sake! :roll:

On a similar note.

People who pronouce "aitch" (as in the letter H) as "haitch". There ain't no bleedin' "h" at the start of it, so stop pronouncing it that way.

Captain Chickenpants
22-Apr-2005, 10:02
A couple of things.

Night almost certainly comes from the german Nacht (meaning night).

(taken from here http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/nikolas.lloyd/opinion/badeng.html
Lieutenant: This derives from a French word. Literally, it refers to the man who becomes the tenant of command in lieu of the captain - lieutenant. One could assume a French accent, I suppose, and pronounce it as would the snail-chewing scoundrels from the Land of Garlic. However, we Brits have adopted our own way of saying the word, and this refers to the meaning of it. The man who is left as tenant of command when the captain is away is the “left-tenant”, and that is how the word is pronounced. The Americans manage an interesting double, and pronounce it in a way that reflects neither its meaning nor its origins, and they say “loo-tenan”. I know of no reason to copy them.

CC

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 10:05
A couple of things.

Night almost certainly comes from the german Nacht (meaning night).

(taken from here http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/nikolas.lloyd/opinion/badeng.html
Lieutenant: This derives from a French word. Literally, it refers to the man who becomes the tenant of command in lieu of the captain - lieutenant. One could assume a French accent, I suppose, and pronounce it as would the snail-chewing scoundrels from the Land of Garlic. However, we Brits have adopted our own way of saying the word, and this refers to the meaning of it. The man who is left as tenant of command when the captain is away is the “left-tenant”, and that is how the word is pronounced. The Americans manage an interesting double, and pronounce it in a way that reflects neither its meaning nor its origins, and they say “loo-tenan”. I know of no reason to copy them.

CC

Which in turn comes from Latin, Noctem (I think, bit rusty on my Latin these days).

Crisidelm
22-Apr-2005, 10:16
A couple of things.

Night almost certainly comes from the german Nacht (meaning night).

(taken from here http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/nikolas.lloyd/opinion/badeng.html
Lieutenant: This derives from a French word. Literally, it refers to the man who becomes the tenant of command in lieu of the captain - lieutenant. One could assume a French accent, I suppose, and pronounce it as would the snail-chewing scoundrels from the Land of Garlic. However, we Brits have adopted our own way of saying the word, and this refers to the meaning of it. The man who is left as tenant of command when the captain is away is the “left-tenant”, and that is how the word is pronounced. The Americans manage an interesting double, and pronounce it in a way that reflects neither its meaning nor its origins, and they say “loo-tenan”. I know of no reason to copy them.

CC

Which in turn comes from Latin, Noctem (I think, bit rusty on my Latin these days).

Ehm, nox / noctis

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 10:22
Ehm, nox / noctis

:lol: Hey i did say i'm rusty!! Where di i get Noctem from?! :roll: :lol:

Basic
22-Apr-2005, 10:22
It's "aluminium" in Swedish too.

And about the auto-incorrection in Word. The Swedish version still have the English rule to capitalize "i". But "i" is the Swedish word for "in", and it shouldn't be capitalized (other than in the beginning of sentence).

Crisidelm
22-Apr-2005, 10:24
Ehm, nox / noctis

:lol: Hey i did say i'm rusty!! Where di i get Noctem from?! :roll: :lol:

Complete declination (not plural), as I recall it:
nox
noctis
nocti
noctem
nox
nocte

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 10:24
It's "aluminium" in Swedish too.

And about the auto-incorrection in Word. The Swedish version still have the English rule to capitalize "i". But "i" is the Swedish word for "in", and it shouldn't be capitalized (other than in the beginning of sentence).

You leave you Word in Swedish, and it still corrects that?! :roll: :roll:

Nick[FM]
22-Apr-2005, 11:08
So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 11:10
]So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Errr as far as i know "thru" is just the lazy version of "through". Though i wouldn't be surprised if it made the dictionary lately. I mean, if Bootilicious made it there... :roll:

Gerry
22-Apr-2005, 11:10
]So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Not to mention the countless people who seem to spell it as "threw".

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 11:16
]So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Not to mention the countless people who seem to spell it as "threw".

OUCH!! That hurt.

Like when people use "of" instead of "have", like "I should of done that"... It physically hurts.

sytaylor
22-Apr-2005, 12:28
]So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Not to mention the countless people who seem to spell it as "threw".

OUCH!! That hurt.

Like when people use "of" instead of "have", like "I should of done that"... It physically hurts.

Thing is whilst I don't type like that, I do speak like that. This is a subject I absolutley adore, because yanks seem to have such a passion for learning about the differences but actually have no clue. They're so innocent and sheltered.

Take for example yorkshire. I say "york-shur", it sounds nothing like the shire from lotr. One of the most amusing things however is that modern english people language is litered with americanisms, the only difference is we notice the ones we don't use. There is a great book by bill bryson on the subject, I forget the name, its not even listed on his site... hmm.

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 12:30
]So what about "thru" and "through"? Is "thru" only word for the lazy ones? :wink: Google gave me 767 000 000 hits for "through" and only 12 500 000 hits for "thru".

Not to mention the countless people who seem to spell it as "threw".

OUCH!! That hurt.

Like when people use "of" instead of "have", like "I should of done that"... It physically hurts.

Thing is whilst I don't type like that, I do speak like that. This is a subject I absolutley adore, because yanks seem to have such a passion for learning about the differences but actually have no clue. They're so innocent and sheltered.

Take for example yorkshire. I say "york-shur", it sounds nothing like the shire from lotr. One of the most amusing things however is that modern english people language is litered with americanisms, the only difference is we notice the ones we don't use. There is a great book by bill bryson on the subject, I forget the name, its not even listed on his site... hmm.

Yeah that's because u're northern SCUM! :lol: :twisted:

sytaylor
22-Apr-2005, 12:42
DIRRRRRTY SOUTHERN BASTID

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 12:45
DIRRRRRTY SOUTHERN BASTID

Dirty?!?! At least i don't fuck sheep.

Druga Runda
22-Apr-2005, 12:52
aluminium in Croatian too :P (at least IIRC)

sytaylor
22-Apr-2005, 13:00
DIRRRRRTY SOUTHERN BASTID

Dirty?!?! At least i don't fuck sheep.

Everything but ;)

Besides I may live near the farmers that do that, even peddle the video smut... but doesnt mean I have to take part :p

ndoogoo
22-Apr-2005, 13:00
The English language has too many rules, exceptions to the rules and words sounding the same. It is about time the world had a universal language with easy and logical rules.

I think a good language is one were you can kind of guess what a word means, even if you have never seen that word before. The actual build up of the word describes the object or action. This means the classification of everything.

I want a logical scientific language with built in music (words that sound great in songs) and creative section.

Reverend
22-Apr-2005, 13:13
BTW, here's a secret :

The correct way to say "Beyond3D" is "Beyonded". You know Dave Barron, Kristof and Marco... being g33ks and all...

MuFu
22-Apr-2005, 13:14
BTW, here's a secret :

The correct way to say "Beyond3D" is "Beyonded". You know Dave Barron, Kristof and Marco... being g33ks and all...

:lol:

ndoogoo
22-Apr-2005, 13:23
BTW, here's a secret :

The correct way to say "Beyond3D" is "Beyonded". You know Dave Barron, Kristof and Marco... being g33ks and all...

:shock:

Ah well, that's not to bad. "Beyond3D 0ws3 j0 in rl tbh m7". I really that online gaming slang.

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 13:25
Lieutenant: This derives from a French word. Literally, it refers to the man who becomes the tenant of command in lieu of the captain - lieutenant. One could assume a French accent, I suppose, and pronounce it as would the snail-chewing scoundrels from the Land of Garlic. However, we Brits have adopted our own way of saying the word, and this refers to the meaning of it. The man who is left as tenant of command when the captain is away is the “left-tenant”, and that is how the word is pronounced. The Americans manage an interesting double, and pronounce it in a way that reflects neither its meaning nor its origins, and they say “loo-tenan”. I know of no reason to copy them.

CC
Thanks Capt, that does explain it rather nicely. :)

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 13:27
Well i always thought it came from Dave's perversity... I mean the 3D has a funny shape when you actually look at it horizontally. And Beyond 3D would look like on of those S&M sites around the web.

Mariner
22-Apr-2005, 14:15
There is a great book by bill bryson on the subject, I forget the name, its not even listed on his site... hmm.

Bryson's book is called "Mother Tongue" - a reasonable and interesting read.

There is nothing too wrong with speaking in dialect, I suppose but there are exceptions: where I live, some people ask to "borry" things instead of borrowing and people aren't treated badly, they are "tret badly" - both these get on my nerves.

A note for Americans: Worcestershire Sauce is pronounced "Wuster" Sauce. :wink:

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 14:25
There is a great book by bill bryson on the subject, I forget the name, its not even listed on his site... hmm.

Bryson's book is called "Mother Tongue" - a reasonable and interesting read.

There is nothing too wrong with speaking in dialect, I suppose but there are exceptions: where I live, some people ask to "borry" things instead of borrowing and people aren't treated badly, they are "tret badly" - both these get on my nerves.

A note for Americans: Worcestershire Sauce is pronounced "Wuster" Sauce. :wink:

In the Americans' defense, all foreigners pronounce Leicester and all the "-cester's" the wrong way, until they discover how to say it and go "BUT WHYYYY!!?!?!", understandably.

Kanyamagufa
22-Apr-2005, 14:49
Ehm, nox / noctis

:lol: Hey i did say i'm rusty!! Where di i get Noctem from?! :roll: :lol:

Complete declination (not plural), as I recall it:
nox
noctis
nocti
noctem
nox
nocte

Rocking the 3rd Declension!!

Gotta love the Latin.

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 14:50
A note for Americans: Worcestershire Sauce is pronounced "Wuster" Sauce. :wink:
Really? I've always just sort of mangled out "worst-eh-shire". :oops:

Thanks for setting me straight.

Any other good terms I'm lacking on? Do brits pronounce "cache" as "cash" or "cash-ay"?

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 14:54
A note for Americans: Worcestershire Sauce is pronounced "Wuster" Sauce. :wink:
Really? I've always just sort of mangled out "worst-eh-shire". :oops:

Thanks for setting me straight.

Any other good terms I'm lacking on? Do brits pronounce "cache" as "cash" or "cash-ay"?

Cash.

:D

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 15:00
Nuts. I guess I'm the only one then who thinks it should be pronounced "cash-ay". :oops:

Mariner
22-Apr-2005, 15:04
My personal favourite was a couple of years back when the Queen and Phil the Greek were introduced to Congress (or possibly the Senate) as:

"Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth and the Dook of Edinberg". :)

I almost feel as though I'm picking on our American cousins here until I remember how we English are represented in American movies and TV programmes!

Do brits pronounce "cache" as "cash" or "cash-ay"?

Well, I pronounce it "cash" which I believe is correct. Surely the word cachet would be pronounced "cash-ay"? Unfortunately, I don't have my OED with me to check the phonetics. :)

Can you think of any American words which we British pronounce in an amusingly bad way? Place names would be the oddest, I expect.

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 15:09
Can you think of any American words which we British pronounce in an amusingly bad way? Place names would be the oddest, I expect.
Anything that ends in 'a'.

Chiner, for example, is the one that irritates me the most when listening to BBC news.

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 15:09
And for God's sake, what's with Word and the autocorrect of "Cheque" to "check". It is SO friggin annoying.

A cheque is that thing u write an amount on and sign to pay someone, check is a verb. Different things.

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 15:16
Kind of like a masque and a mask? :|

Frank
22-Apr-2005, 15:26
I wrote an editorial a few years ago (can't remember what it was used for), in which I claimed that people nowadays only think something is correct when Word says so, no matter what a dictionary or whatever has to say about it.

And yes, in Dutch there are quite some annoyingly incorrect "corrections" as well, most of which are now proclaimed to be the right way by almost everyone.

I never use a spelling checker, mostly because of that. It annoys me. Sorry if I make the occasional error! But almost everyone feels the need to do so, in my experience.

Gerry
22-Apr-2005, 15:30
Chiner, for example, is the one that irritates me the most when listening to BBC news.

Bah humbug. I call your Chiner, and raise you an "eye-raq".

:wink:

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 15:33
*CRINGE*


Call your Eye-raq, raise a Mah-slim.

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 15:33
Its usually 'eh-rock' on the tele. Though I know people who say it "eye-rack"

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 15:47
"Nukaler" is the one that really raises my hackles lately. http://66.224.5.66/board/images/smilies/bleh2.gif

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 15:48
"Nukaler" is the one that really raises my hackles lately. http://66.224.5.66/board/images/smilies/bleh2.gif

:shock: What is THAT?!

digitalwanderer
22-Apr-2005, 15:51
"Nukaler" is the one that really raises my hackles lately. http://66.224.5.66/board/images/smilies/bleh2.gif

:shock: What is THAT?!
How Emperor George mangles the word "nuclear". :oops:

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 16:16
To be fair, he says "new-queue-lar", not "new-k-lar'

Jimmy Carter did the same thing. I think its a southern thing.

Shifty's Bitch
22-Apr-2005, 16:18
To be fair, he says "new-queue-lar", not "new-k-lar'

Jimmy Carter did the same thing. I think its a southern thing.

:shock: I never knew!!! I've got to find a clip somewhere....

Mariner
22-Apr-2005, 17:08
I can actually remember almost everyone saying Nuclear in the same way as Georgie-boy back when I was a kid. Perhaps it was just because we were kids!

Another thing that gets my goat is the way in which 'disrespect' seems to have become widely used as a verb in recent years. It might actually be a correct usage for all I know but it still sounds wrong to me. I always prefer to show disrespect to someone myself. :wink:

Russ, I can't quite think what you mean when you say we English mispronounce 'China'. I can only think of one way to say it and can't think of an alternative pronunciation! :?:

Bouncing Zabaglione Bros.
22-Apr-2005, 18:26
Russ, I can't quite think what you mean when you say we English mispronounce 'China'. I can only think of one way to say it and can't think of an alternative pronunciation! :?:


Yes, I've never heard "Chiner" from anyone round here - it's always "Chine-a".

RussSchultz
22-Apr-2005, 18:50
Russ, I can't quite think what you mean when you say we English mispronounce 'China'. I can only think of one way to say it and can't think of an alternative pronunciation! :?:
Your BBC radio news people regularly refer to it as "Chiner". Perhaps its not super distinct, but there is an 'r' sound at the end. I've heard it from quite a number of Brits, actually.

Mariner
22-Apr-2005, 20:49
Can't say I've noticed that at all.

I'll keep an ear open for it!

sytaylor
22-Apr-2005, 23:30
And for God's sake, what's with Word and the autocorrect of "Cheque" to "check". It is SO friggin annoying.

A cheque is that thing u write an amount on and sign to pay someone, check is a verb. Different things.

seconded, thirded and fourthed! I hate those dman red wavy under lines!

sytaylor
22-Apr-2005, 23:31
Russ, I can't quite think what you mean when you say we English mispronounce 'China'. I can only think of one way to say it and can't think of an alternative pronunciation! :?:
Your BBC radio news people regularly refer to it as "Chiner". Perhaps its not super distinct, but there is an 'r' sound at the end. I've heard it from quite a number of Brits, actually.

Yeah we think we're saying "china", but its "chy-nuh" which sounds like it has an "r" on the end.

nutball
23-Apr-2005, 07:49
Ah the famous gutteral stop.

China will be pronounced differently depending on your regional accent. I'm a Chiner meself, where I grew up it was Choy-nerr, where I live now it's Choy-no'h. In Liverpool it'd be Chin-nehh. In the mid-North it's Chah-nah.

Mariner
23-Apr-2005, 09:55
In the mid-North it's Chah-nah.

E by gum - tha's reet (as my brother-in-law might say). :)

sytaylor
25-Apr-2005, 08:39
In the mid-North it's Chah-nah.

E by gum - tha's reet (as my brother-in-law might say). :)

at'eh reet sitheh? Chah-nah is more manchester than yorkshire, but I kinda say stuff like that by accident. My accent is hard to place because my mum is from hebbden bridge which is right on the borderline between yorkshire and evil lancishire.

davefb
25-Apr-2005, 09:43
DIRRRRRTY SOUTHERN BASTID

Dirty?!?! At least i don't fuck sheep.

no,, you'd fuck a ram ;)

Shifty's Bitch
25-Apr-2005, 09:45
DIRRRRRTY SOUTHERN BASTID

Dirty?!?! At least i don't fuck sheep.

no,, you'd fuck a ram ;)

why would i fuck a piece of silicon. it's cold. unless i use it straight from my PC.

sytaylor
25-Apr-2005, 10:22
Scared of the cold? Makes things look not so long, dong boy :p

Shifty's Bitch
25-Apr-2005, 11:01
Scared of the cold? Makes things look not so long, dong boy :p

And whats with the speed increase all the time!! I don't want it to last less long everytime!! I'm stuck with EDO ram, these new DDRs are just too quick for me.

sytaylor
25-Apr-2005, 11:44
faster RAM doesnt mean its all over sooner, just that it can keep a higher pace...

Shifty's Bitch
25-Apr-2005, 11:54
faster RAM doesnt mean its all over sooner, just that it can keep a higher pace...

It overheats faster, you always need to blow on it or it goes down.

sytaylor
25-Apr-2005, 13:22
faster RAM doesnt mean its all over sooner, just that it can keep a higher pace...

It overheats faster, you always need to blow on it or it goes down.

The architectural complexities are a side effect of increased performance.

Shifty's Bitch
25-Apr-2005, 14:14
faster RAM doesnt mean its all over sooner, just that it can keep a higher pace...

It overheats faster, you always need to blow on it or it goes down.

The architectural complexities are a side effect of increased performance.

Still doesn't explain all the blowing.

Blitzkrieg
28-Apr-2005, 08:36
Umm is it just me or that link has some errors?

"In 1807, Davy proposed the name aluminum for the metal, undiscovered at that time, and later agreed to change it to aluminum"

So he agree to change it to the same spelling? WTF?

Shortly thereafter, the name aluminum was adopted to conform with the "ium" ending of most elements, and this spelling is now in use elsewhere in the world.

Conform with, would be the same would it not?
So the name aluminum, no i , is adopted to conform with the ium ending?

Id say the entire old British empire says Aluminium, and if China does too, then the Yanks should get in behind.

Blitzkrieg
28-Apr-2005, 08:40
Oh and on a side not of differences between USA english and english elsewhere.

My mother went to the world archery championships in Indonesia and made great friends with the american contigent.
One day one of the american ladies did not show up.
My mother asked why.
She was told " Because she has a sore fanny from rooting all day"
Which I am sure most americans, and probably British ppl know what they meant.
However in NZ, that translates as, "Because she has a sore cunt from fucking all day"
Needless to say the NZers had a good laugh and the Americans where a bit horrified to learn what it meant in NZ.

Also funny, Rubber in NZ = eraser, Rubber in USA = Condom
I am sure I have heard some other shockers as well.
I always found TV show "The Nanny" quite funny.
With the lyrics in the beginning saying how she was "kicked out on her fanny". Which I imagine if done the NZ way would have bloody hurt :)

Mariner
28-Apr-2005, 08:50
Well, the meaning of 'Fanny' in the UK is the same as in New Zealand. When I've heard Americans talk about 'Fanny Packs' I always wonder, "Where can I get one of those!" :P

Condoms are 'Rubber Johnnies' or just 'Johnnies' here. :)

davefb
28-Apr-2005, 09:28
She was told " Because she has a sore fanny from rooting all day"


rooting? so she had a sore arse because she over indulged in anal sex?


what the chuff is rooting ? ?

Shifty's Bitch
28-Apr-2005, 09:35
What's a fanny for americans!?!?

On a side note, i have a colleague in Hong Kong whose name is Fanny Handy. Serious. Lovely girl, but really...

nutball
28-Apr-2005, 09:59
She was told " Because she has a sore fanny from rooting all day"


rooting? so she had a sore arse because she over indulged in anal sex?


what the chuff is rooting ? ?

Rooting in Aussie slang for bonking isn't it?

Reverend
28-Apr-2005, 10:29
Oh yeah, forgot this one word :

<hurghkh... ptooei>

"phlegm".

Simon F
28-Apr-2005, 13:08
what the chuff is rooting ? ?
It's an Australian (and Kiwi?) expression:

From: http://www.dunway.com/html/aussie_slang.html

Root Synonym for F*CK. A word not normally used in [mixed] company.

Thus the "panda/wombat" joke works better in Australia because a wombat "eats roots shoots and leaves".

PVR_Extremist
28-Apr-2005, 13:15
The one that gets foreigners is the town of:

Loughborough

I heard one poor Aussie pronounce it

Loo-ga-ba-roo-ga

ROFL !!!! :lol:

Go on you yanks....give us your pronunciation (without looking up a dictionary or using a search engine ;) ) I need a good chortle ;)

Shifty's Bitch
28-Apr-2005, 13:22
The one that gets foreigners is the town of:

Loughborough

I heard one poor Aussie pronounce it

Loo-ga-ba-roo-ga

ROFL !!!! :lol:

Go on you yanks....give us your pronunciation (without looking up a dictionary or using a search engine ;) ) I need a good chortle ;)


:lol: :lol: :lol: I heard 2 japanese tourists on the tube trying to say Tottenham Court Road...
Sounded a bit like this:

Tot-ten-ammo Cot-to Ro-addo

Then trying "West India Quay"... West India was ok, but the Quay just made me laugh, can't even remember how they were saying it...

But your Loogabarooga is teh beast!

sytaylor
28-Apr-2005, 13:42
*warms up sexy deep yorkshire accent*

Luff-bur-ugh 8)

I win!

Shifty's Bitch
28-Apr-2005, 13:55
*warms up sexy deep yorkshire accent*

Luff-bur-ugh 8)

I win!


EWWWWW It's Laugh-Boh-Roh :lol: :lol: Really open... like, Essex open. :twisted:

sytaylor
28-Apr-2005, 13:58
Take off those white stilettos and get back daaaan bas...

Shifty's Bitch
28-Apr-2005, 14:05
Take off those white stilettos and get back daaaan bas...

OI! Aint got sty-let-ters meself! :lol:

sytaylor
28-Apr-2005, 14:25
Tha's avin me on... :?

Blitzkrieg
29-Apr-2005, 07:12
Just to make things clearer, rooting = cheering in the US
Fanny = butt.


LOL at yorkshire accent, my mate is from yorkshire.
Sounds kiwi with his mates, talks to his parents and switches back into full on yorkshire accent, I love giving him shit over it.

Also on peoples names, I have gone to school with ppl whose last names were Longbottom and Crapp.

Simon F
29-Apr-2005, 07:43
Also on peoples names, I have gone to school with ppl whose last names were Longbottom and Crapp.
As for the last name, do you know who developed the modern (i.e with pull chain etc) flushing toilet?